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FirstEnergy Solutions

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The Ohio Attorney General is looking over referendum language filed by a group fighting the state’s new energy law.

power lines near Canel Winchester, Ohio
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio legislators have passed new energy laws that affects everyone’s electric bills and change the state’s course on green energy policies. But it can be easy to get bogged down by all the information contained in the bill, here's a breakdown.

Perry Nuclear Power Plant in Perry, Ohio
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts has filed its first round of signatures with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office to hold a referendum on the law that bails out nuclear plants and scraps green energy policies.

Ohio House

The Ohio House Speaker said opponents of the state’s new energy law will need big money to overturn it.

The Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station on Lake Erie is scheduled to shut down in 2020.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, host Mike Thompson discusses the new state law that bails out two nuclear power plants and scraps renewable energy mandates. Statehouse News Bureau reporter Andy Chow joins the show.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The passage of HB 6 this week not only gave Ohio’s two FirstEnergy Solutions nuclear plants a $150 million subsidy to remain open, it also keeps the communities and school districts relying on those plants' taxes from taking an additional financial hit.

The Ohio House has voted in favor of the sweeping energy bill, HB6, that bails out two nuclear power plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The Ohio House will try again Tuesday to hold a vote on the sweeping energy bill which could bail out nuclear power plants and would end energy efficiency requirements for utilities.

FirstEnergy Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / AP

The sweeping energy bill aimed at saving nuclear plants from shutting down while making big cuts to renewable and efficiency policies was put on hold Wednesday, due to four lawmakers who were not present at the Ohio Statehouse.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

FirstEnergy Solutions says it will continue its plans to deactivate and decommission Ohio's two nuclear power plants since lawmakers were not able to pass a bailout measure before their June 30 deadline. The energy company says there’s still time to reverse course, though.

solar panels
Pixabay

The Senate has made its own sweeping changes to Ohio energy policy through a substitute bill version of HB6 that continues to bailout nuclear power plants but avoids repealing renewable energy and energy efficiency standards.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The fight over giving a financial lifeline to Ohio's two nuclear plants by tacking a new fee onto every Ohioans' electricity bill might not end even if state lawmakers agree on a solution this week.

The Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station on Lake Erie is scheduled to shut down in 2020.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The Ohio House passed a sweeping energy bill, HB6, that would bail out the state’s two nuclear power plants and wipe out green energy standards, with the help of Democratic support.

Davis Besse nuclear power plant
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Opponents are speaking out against the bill that would prop up two struggling nuclear plants while also tossing out the state’s green energy requirements for utilities. There’s a debate over whether the legislation will end up saving a person more or less on their electric bills.

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