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FDA

The Food and Drug Administration sent a letter to the food industry on Thursday, urging companies to get behind the initiative to standardize the use of the phrase "best if used by" on packaged food labels.

Quotecatalog.com / Flickr

A new study at Nationwide Children’s Hospital finds the misuse of the popular herbal supplement "kratom" could lead to serious health conditions or even death.

The Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that it will seek a ban on the sale of menthol-flavored cigarettes.

The announcement came as the agency officially released a detailed plan to also restrict the sale of flavored electronic cigarettes. It also wants to ban flavored cigars.

Federal regulators want to ban the sale of most flavored e-cigarettes at retail locations like gas stations and convenience stores and require anyone buying e-cigarettes online to verify their age.

Nurse Nicole Simpson prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta on Feb. 7, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

Doctors will have a new drug in their arsenal to help people fight the flu this year. The Food and Drug Administration approved a new medication Wednesday that combats the flu with one dose.

In hospitals across the country, anesthesiologists and other doctors are facing significant shortages of injectable opioids. Drugs such as morphine, Dilaudid and fentanyl are the mainstays of intravenous pain control and are regularly used in critical care settings like surgery, intensive care units and hospital emergency departments.

A marijuana-derived drug the U.S. Food and Drug Administration just approved has connections to Cincinnati.

A Discussion on the "Right To Try" Bill

Jun 5, 2018
Pixabay

President Trump signed the ‘Right To Try’ drug bill last week, allowing terminally ill patients access to experimental medical treatments not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration. We discuss the key features of the bill and also have a conversation with a proponent and opponent of it.

Well, it's official. Beginning today, all restaurant chains in the U.S. with 20 or more locations must post calories on menus or menu boards.

When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, back in 2010, the federal calorie posting mandate was born.

Many chains, including McDonald's, Panera and Starbucks, began posting calories several years back. But the proposed regulations hit several snags as industry groups lobbied for changes. Now, there's no escaping them.

The Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday they will take steps to crack down on the sale of e-cigarette products to children and teenagers. More than two million middle and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2016 and that number has continued to grow.

Scott Gottlieb, the Food and Drug Administration commissioner appointed by the Trump administration, has this in common with Michelle Obama: He wants to know what's in the food he eats.

And this, it seems, includes calorie counts.

Now, the FDA has released its guidance on implementing an Obama-era rule that requires chain restaurants and other food establishments to post calories on menus or menu boards. The mandate was written into the Affordable Care Act back in 2010.

For many pregnant women, understanding what seafood is safe and healthy, and what should be avoided because of mercury concerns comes with a lot of hand-wringing. In part, that's because the federal government's advice on the matter, first issued in 2004, has long been criticized as unclear.

That guidance has included advice on how much seafood to eat, and which species pregnant and nursing women should avoid over concerns about mercury contamination.

Beth Briczinski has been keeping a list of all the things companies are turning into products labeled as a kind of milk. "There's soy and almond and rice," she says. "Hemp, pistachio, macadamia nut, sunflower."

Briczinski is highly annoyed by these products. She's vice president for dairy foods and nutrition at the National Milk Producers Federation, which represents the original milk producers: dairy farmers.

Jeni's Balked At FDA Records Requests In 2013, 2014

Jul 6, 2015
Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams

Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams has shut down twice, this year. Each time, the company has been transparent about finding listeria in its production kitchen. But FDA records reveal Jeni's was not as open with inspectors, last year -- nine months before this spring's recall. 

Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams

Federal Food and Drug Administration inspection reports reveal many problems with Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams current and former production facility. Jeni’s plans to re-open tomorrow after a month-long voluntary shut down and recall which followed the discovery of listeria in some of its ice cream. 

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