farming

The order came in April. China's government instructed farmers in the country's northeastern breadbasket region to grow more soybeans, calling it "a political priority."

But soybean fields lay empty in the village of Sandaogou, which means "Three Ditches," in Liaoning province. It has been a dry spring.

"We've had a drought this year, so we planted soybeans late. The seedlings should be out by now. We need more rain," says farmer Liu, who only gives her surname for fear of trouble with local authorities. Soy, after all, has become "political."

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An Ohio State study finds that some Ohio farmers could lose more than half of their annual income if a threatened 25 percent tariff goes into effect on soybeans and corn sent to China.

From Craft Breweries To Cows

Jun 9, 2018

The beer brewing process kicks off at around 5 a.m. at Mike Hess Brewing. They are creating Hess' craft beers, from an IPA to a darker stout or porter.

But brewing also produces waste — and a lot of it.

The waste is called spent grain, and founder Mike Hess said they make about 20,000 pounds a week.

Updated at 9:14 a.m. ET

Mexico is putting tariffs on imports of U.S. steel and farm products — including pork, cheese, apples and potatoes — as it hits back at the U.S. for the Trump administration's tariffs on steel and aluminum products from Mexico, Canada and the European Union.

Signed by Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, the decree also suspends the country's preferential tariff treatment of the U.S. It was published in Mexico's official gazette on Tuesday.

Suicide rates among farmers are higher than any other profession in the United States and now some experts and Senators worry Washington politics could be making farmland stresses even worse.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is meeting with Chinese officials this week to discuss trade tariffs. President Trump announced a tariff on Chinese steel and aluminum and the Chinese responded with tariffs on American products. It’s escalated to at least $50 billion dollars in tariffs for each country. The extra charges on Chinese steel may please Ohio steelworkers but it worries Ohio farmers. 

Tom Trout of Hickory Tree Farm in Medina County walks through his garage by several 8-wheel-drive John Deere tractors and other equipment.

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Ohio hog farmers are reacting to the news that China is planning to attach a tariff on pork exports – a move in response to the U.S. proposed tariff on Chinese steel. Ohio farmers say they’ve seen an immediate effect from the announcement.

Brian Johnson and Dane Brian / Flickr

Ohio farmers are pushing back against the Trump administration after China made good on promises to respond to recent U.S. tariffs with tariffs of its own.

Challenges for New Farmers

Feb 5, 2018
tractor in farm field
Jean Beaufort / Public Domain Pictures

The rise in food awareness has also contributed to a new interest in agriculture. Meanwhile, growing land costs and lack of government assistance are just two of the obstacles facing young, up and coming farmers. 

Today, we take a look at the challenges that new farmers face in the agriculture business.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture predicts consumers will be paying less for beef, pork, lamb, chicken and turkey in early 2018 than at the start of 2017. Not so for eggs.

Chris Newman used to be a software engineering manager, well-paid, but he worked long hours, ate fast food and went to the doctor a lot.

Eventually, enough was enough. He and his wife moved from the Washington, D.C., area to Charlottesville, Va., to become farmers. Now he is healthier, has fewer stomach problems and can eat dairy products again. He raises pigs, ducks and chickens.

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

At Dale Tree Farm in Delaware County, Shannon Schoch and her family found just the right tree.

"You guys like this one?" Schoch asks. "Yeah, I like it. It has a good shape at the top."

If you usually ring in the holiday with a freshly cut evergreen, your reality this Christmas could very well be a scrawny Charlie Brown tree instead — or you may wind up paying more for a lush Fraser fir.

This year, there is a tree shortage. Most growers blame the tightened supply on the Great Recession, says Valerie Bauerlein, who covered the story for The Wall Street Journal.

A new report from the International Joint Commission, a bi-national agency, says the Great Lakes restoration continues to progress -- but not quickly enough.

  

Great Lakes Vineyard Confronts Climate Change

Nov 28, 2017
Grapes at 21 Brix Winery and farm in western New York.
Angelica A. Morrison / Great Lakes Today

Just a few miles from Lake Erie, farmer Mike Jordan takes me on a walk through his vineyard. On a work utility vehicle we move through the rows of vines bursting with purple and high yellow grapes.

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