farm bill

Shea Castleberry works in a time capsule of sorts. He walks through the aisles of the Family Video store he manages in Murray, Ky., a small city surrounded by rolling farmland about two hours north of Nashville.

Next to the movies and popcorn, there's a new addition to his store that surprises some of his regulars.

"A lot of people are like 'a video store selling CBD?' But it really does tie into our values. Which is, we're here for the community," Castleberry said.

Lesley L. / Flickr Creative Commons

Among the many provisions of the 2018 Farm Bill is the legalization of widespread production of hemp. Congress approved the compromise last week, and President Trump is expected to sign it into law. But Ohio could lose a chance to capitalize on the new industry if lawmakers maintain the state's prohibition on the study and cultivation of hemp.

Lawmakers unveiled the much-anticipated farm bill compromise Monday night, ending the months-long impasse over whether a critical piece of legislation that provides subsidies to farmers and helps needy Americans buy groceries could pass before the lame-duck session concludes at the end of the year.

House and Senate negotiators are reportedly close to finalizing a framework on a farm bill compromise in hopes it will pass both chambers of Congress and be on the president's desk by the end of the year.

According to a spokesperson for Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., House and Senate committee staff worked through the weekend and again on Monday "exchanging offers daily" as last details are being ironed out.

By a razor-thin margin, the House of Representatives passed its version of the farm bill Thursday as Republican leadership was able to round up just enough support from members of its conservative wing to clear passage.

The GOP-backed measure, which covers farm and food policy legislation, passed 213-211.

The $867 billion package renews the safety net for farmers across the country, but also includes tougher work requirements for recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Program or SNAP, formerly known as food stamps.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

The Senate Agriculture Committee passed its version of a Farm Bill and sent it to the full chamber, which is expected to vote before the July 4 recess. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), a committee member, says there’s a lot in the bill for Ohio. 

Keitha Simpson at the Marysville Food Pantry.
Nick Evans

Volunteers box up food for the morning rush at the Marysville Food Pantry while Keitha Simpson stands in an aisle lined with cases of food.

“You name it—any kind of non-perishable you would want,” she says. “Canned vegetables, fruits, pastas, pasta sauce.”

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

The House rejected a $867 billion farm bill on Friday — after spending days negotiating with key conservatives in an attempt to pass the bill without the support of Democrats.

The vote was 198-213. Every Democrat voted against the measure, as did 30 Republicans. Many of the GOP lawmakers are members of the House Freedom Caucus and voted no after failing to get concessions on spending and a future vote on immigration in exchange for their support.

Suicide rates among farmers are higher than any other profession in the United States and now some experts and Senators worry Washington politics could be making farmland stresses even worse.

If Republicans in Congress have their way, millions of people who get food aid through the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) will have to find a job or attend job training classes for about 20 hours each week, or lose their benefits.

10:00 At the end of October, 850,000 Ohio households could find themselves with less to spend on food when SNAP loses some of its funding. In addition, House Republicans have proposed legislation shaving another $40 billion from the program.  This hour we'll talk about food assistance, get an update on the Farm Bill, and discuss how best to keep all Ohioans fed. Guests

11:00 We're live at the 2013 Public Health Farmers Market, and what better location from which to discuss the Farm Bill? This year's bill, which contains stripped-out nutrition programs and food stamp funding, has left many food banks wondering how they'll fare.  This hour we'll talk about what's next for the nation's farmers and those who rely on food assistance. Guest

10:00 Even without secret tests in the desert, it looks like the Senate has narrowly avoided the "nuclear option--" a split along party lines that threatened to rewrite rules regarding approval of executive branch nominees. And that's just one topic on this hour's All Sides. We'll be joined by Ken Rudin, who will walk us through the latest news and quagmires in Washington. Guests

  • Ken Rudin, NPR's Political Junkie