Facebook

Updated at 10:55 a.m. ET

Facebook said it won't accept any new political ads in the week leading up to the presidential election, one of several policies that CEO Mark Zuckerberg said will help ensure a fair election in November. One such measure involves deleting posts that claim people will get COVID-19 if they vote.

Facebook is announcing a new initiative for the 2020 election. The social network giant will offer voters information about voting in their state. And it will also fact check information on its platform. 

This July 16, 2013 file photo shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif.
Ben Margot / Associated Press

Construction on Facebook's billion-dollar campus in New Albany is being put on hold after racist graffiti was discovered at the site. All construction workers are being required to undergo anti-bias training. 

Updated at 7:17 p.m. ET

Some of the world's most powerful CEOs are coming to Capitol Hill — virtually, of course — to answer one overarching question: Do the biggest technology companies use their reach and power to hurt competitors and help themselves?

Here's what you need to know:

Who: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

Updated at 9:54 p.m. ET

Facebook on Thursday said it removed campaign posts and advertisements from the Trump campaign featuring an upside down red triangle symbol once used by Nazis to identify political opponents.

The posts, according to a Facebook spokesperson, violated the social network's policy against hate.

"Our policy prohibits using a banned hate group's symbol to identify political prisoners without the context that condemns or discusses the symbol," the spokesperson told NPR.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

The Justice Department is proposing legislation to curtail online platforms' legal protections for the content they carry.

The proposal comes nearly three weeks after President Trump signed an executive order to limit protections for social media companies after Twitter began adding fact checks to some of his tweets.

Protesters in downtown Columbus on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Major technology companies are responding to growing pressure, internally and externally, against how they have handled controversial social media posts and for supplying law enforcement with facial recognition technology.

Twitter has taken steps to flag controversial posts, including those by the President Donald Trump. Facebook has not followed suit, angering employees.

Joe Biden is demanding that Facebook crack down on false information, including from President Trump, adding his voice to escalating criticism over the social network's hands-off approach to political speech.

map on smartphone
StockSnap / Pixabay

Location data from millions of phones is helping the U.S. government collect clues about COVID-19.

Officials hope that by tracking where people move and gather they can pinpoint how novel coronavirus spreads.

Online platforms have "an ethical obligation" to root out price gouging on hand sanitizer and other high-demand products during the coronavirus pandemic and beyond, top law enforcement officials from across the country say.

Tech Tuesday: Scrutinizing Company Mergers

Feb 18, 2020
Google sign at its headquarters in Mountain View, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

In an unusual move, the Federal Trade Commission ordered five big tech companies to turn over information about smaller companies they’ve acquired since 2010.

Facebook

Facebook used the grand opening of a New Albany data center to announce plans for more investment at the 345-acre campus.

Tech Tuesday: Privacy Rights

Feb 4, 2020
Martin Meissner / Associated Press

Facebook agreed to settle a $550 million class-action lawsuit over its use of facial recognition technology in Illinois. It is believed to be the one of the largest civil settlements involving consumer privacy in U.S. history. 

Tech Tuesday: Dairy Farming Robots

Jan 28, 2020
Jeff Weese / Flickr

Dairy farming in Ohio has gone high-tech. Robots are taking over milking duties on a number of dairy operations in Ohio. 

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Facebook says it's banning many types of misleading videos from its site, in a push against deepfake content and online misinformation campaigns.

Facebook's new ban targets videos that are manipulated to make it appear someone said words they didn't actually say. The company won't allow videos on its site if they've been either edited or computer-generated in ways that the average person couldn't detect.

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