face masks

The Ohio Department of Health will allow trick-or-treating this year, but recommends face masks and social distancing.
Pixabay

No hayrides, haunted houses or Halloween parties should be held this year, the Ohio Department of Health urged in its latest coronavirus guidelines.

A sign on face mask requirements at Sierra Trading Post in Easton.
Darrin McDonald / WOSU

A Republican lawmaker who’s been critical of Ohio’s pandemic response has proposed a bill to cancel the state of emergency order from March. The bill would allow businesses and hospitals to return to full-capacity operations and all schools to in-person learning – with no masks or social distancing required.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks at a campaign rally, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in Zanesville, Ohio. Many of the supporters in the crowd were not wearing a face mask.
Tony Dejak / AP

Pictures of people at political rallies in Ohio recently have shown most of them unmasked, in large crowds. The state’s mask mandate has gone unenforced at those events.

Updated on Sept. 18 at 2:15 p.m. ET

At the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, there were lots of stories about scrappy manufacturers promising to revamp their factories to start making personal protective equipment in the U.S.

Back in the spring, fuel-cell maker Adaptive Energy retooled part of its factory in Ann Arbor, Mich., to make plastic face shields. Now, 100,000 finished shields are piling up in cardboard boxes on the factory floor — unsold.

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday again said widespread distribution of a vaccine against the coronavirus would happen before the end of the year, directly contradicting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield. The CDC chief testified earlier Wednesday that a vaccine would not be widely available until next spring or summer.

Trump said he expects the government to be able to distribute a vaccine "sometime in October," though "it may be a little later than that."

Wellness Wednesday: The Science Behind Face Masks

Sep 9, 2020
A sign on face mask requirements at Sierra Trading Post in Easton.
Darrin McDonald / WOSU

Growing evidence lends credence to the effectiveness of face masks, which CDC director Dr. Robert R. Redfield has called “one of the most powerful weapons we have in the fight against COVID-19.”

Yet mask myths and misconceptions remain.

Updated 2:50 p.m. ET Wednesday

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said it will no longer pay for some safety measures related to COVID-19 that it had previously covered.

Keith Turi, FEMA assistant administrator for recovery, announced the changes during a call Tuesday with state and tribal emergency managers, many of whom expressed concerns about the new policy.

The state has released a reopening plan for the performing arts which takes into account the many variables that come with live theater and music, such as food and intermission. However, a final health order has yet to be signed.

Ohio state Sen. Tina Maharath testfies for a bill in the Ohio Senate.
Tina Maharath / Facebook

State Sen. Tina Maharath (D-Canal Winchester) says she and her family have tested positive for COVID-19.

Election officials around the state are trying to recruit 35,000 poll workers for Election Day in November. Leaders are weighing-in on what conditions poll workers might face when people cast their ballots in-person, which includes if people will be required to wear masks.

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

Joe Biden is calling for everyone in the United States to wear a mask, well into the fall.

"Every single American should be wearing a mask when they're outside for the next three months, at a minimum," Biden said Thursday afternoon in remarks in Wilmington, Del. "Every governor should mandate mandatory mask-wearing. The estimates by the experts are it will save over 40,000 lives."

A sign at the Mill Run nursing home in Hilliard.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Ohio’s nursing homes don’t have enough personal protective equipment to last another week, according to the federal agency that deals with Medicare and Medicaid services. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine on Tuesday added another statewide health order requiring all children in grades K-12 to wear masks while in school, with certain exceptions.

The previous order was for third graders and older. DeWine said the aim is providing safe schools for students and employees when schools return to in-person classes.

With the national death toll from COVID-19 passing the grim 150,000 mark, an NPR/Ipsos poll finds broad support for a single, national strategy to address the pandemic and more aggressive measures to contain it.

Two-thirds of respondents said they believe the U.S. is handling the pandemic worse than other countries, and most want the federal government to take extensive action to slow the spread of the coronavirus, favoring a top-down approach to reopening schools and businesses.

Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

Republican Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas, who during the pandemic has repeatedly refused to wear a mask in public, tested positive for the coronavirus.

His positive test was caught during a routine screening at the White House, Gohmert said. He was slated to attend a trip to West Texas with President Trump.

Pages