extremism

As a violent mob descended on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, lawmakers and aides hid wherever they could, waiting for the military and police to arrive. But many of those who stormed the Capitol were military veterans themselves, who had once sworn to protect the Constitution. In fact, an NPR analysis has found that nearly 1 in 5 people charged over their alleged involvement in the attack on the U.S. Capitol appear to have a military history.

An armed protestor stands outside the Ohio Statehouse Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio.
Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Two Ohioans identified as members of the right-wing Ohio State Regular Militia were arrested  and charged over the weekend for their participation in the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Meanwhile, the Ohio Statehouse on Sunday saw a group of demonstrators espousing an anti-government ideology.

For the first time since the Jan. 6 mob attack on the U.S. Capitol, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell publicly denounced President Trump and his supporters for instigating the insurrection.

"The mob was fed lies," McConnell, R-Ky., said in a speech on the Senate floor Tuesday afternoon.

"They were provoked by the president and other powerful people, and they tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the federal government, which they did not like."

Jessica Watkins and Donovan Crowl, both members of the Ohio State Regular Militia, were arrested for taking part in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.
Montgomery County Jail

Two Champaign County residents who are members of the far-right Ohio State Regular Militia were arrested over the weekend on federal charges that they joined the U.S. Capitol insurrection on January 6.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

Federal investigators say they have arrested several alleged members of extremist and white supremacist groups who participated in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol building, including multiple participants in an alleged conspiracy.

People allegedly affiliated with organizations such as The Three Percenters, The Oath Keepers, Proud Boys, Texas Freedom Force, and other self-described Nazis and white supremacists were among the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol building, according to federal investigators.

About two dozen members of the Ohio Boogaloo Boys, an anti-government group, at the Ohio Statehouse on Jan. 17, 2021.
Clare Roth / WOSU

The "armed march" that was expected in all 50 state capitals and brought out heavy security resulted in just a few dozen protestors in Columbus on Sunday.

Law enforcement erected barriers at the Ohio Statehouse ahead of potentially armed protests on Sunday.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The city of Columbus announced that it will close City Hall and surrounding buildings Tuesday and Wednesday to promote safety around President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. They will already be closed Monday, January 18 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET

The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia said Friday that investigators have not uncovered direct evidence at this point of any "kill/capture teams" targeting elected officials during the U.S. Capitol insurrection, contradicting allegations made earlier by federal prosecutors in Arizona.

U.S. prosecutors in Arizona said Thursday in a court filing against Jacob Chansley, also known as the "QAnon Shaman," that they have "strong evidence" members of the pro-Trump mob wanted to "capture and assassinate" officials.

What do you call the people who violently stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6? Rioters? Insurrectionists? Terrorists? Since the attack, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has used all three labels.

Linda Sarsour, a Muslim, Palestinian American activist with a huge social media following, tweeted, "This is domestic terrorism. Period," and Republican Rep. Nancy Mace from South Carolina also used the label "domestic terrorist" in a tweet.

Supporters of President Donald Trump gathered in front of the Ohio Statehouse on January 6 shortly before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. Mike DeWine announced Thursday that the Ohio Statehouse and state office buildings downtown will be closed from Sunday-Wednesday to prepare for armed protests ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.

In late December, the New York Police Department sent a packet of material to the U.S. Capitol Police and the FBI. It was full of what's known as raw intelligence — bits and pieces of information that turned up by scraping various social media sites. It all indicated that there would likely be violence when lawmakers certified the presidential election on Jan. 6.

For the second time in his presidency, the House is moving to impeach Donald Trump, who will become the first president in history to undergo such a rebuke.

Throughout Wednesday's debate, Democrats portrayed Trump as an ongoing threat to the country and democracy, while Republicans largely either defended the president or argued that the impeachment process would only cause further division.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

Last week's storming of the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob has already resulted in charges against 70 people, according to the acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, who said he expects the number "will grow into the hundreds."

In the first public briefing by the Justice Department and the FBI since Wednesday's riot, acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin and Steven D'Antuono, director of the FBI's Washington Field Office, outlined what Sherwin called a long-term investigation.

Eight days from the end of his presidency, President Trump expressed no regret for his comments last week ahead of a riot and mob violence at the U.S. Capitol that resulted in the deaths of at least five people and multiple injuries.

"People thought that what I said was totally appropriate," Trump said Tuesday when asked about his role in the siege, despite many at the highest levels of government — Republicans and Democrats — saying otherwise, three of his Cabinet members having resigned and a second impeachment effort now underway.

Congressional Response To U.S. Capitol Insurrection

Jan 12, 2021
Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington.
Julio Cortez / AP

House Democrats on Monday took the first step toward impeaching President Donald Trump for inciting the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Today, members are expected to vote on a resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment and declare Trump unfit for office.

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