Energy Bill

FirstEnergy Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / AP

A group is looking to collect signatures statewide to ask voters to overturn the law that bails out nuclear power plants, but now a competing group has formed to argue in favor of the ratepayer subsidies.

A hearing in Akron on First Energy Solutions bankruptcy reorganization has been adjourned for now. A company spokesperson says Judge Alan Koschik, of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Ohio, delayed confirming the company’s reorganization plan at the conclusion of the two-day hearing Wednesday.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

An Ohio electricity company says it is canceling plans to build a gas-fired power plant because of the state's recent nuclear bailout.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

A debate is brewing over whether a group can put the state’s new nuclear bailout bill before voters next year as referendum. The dispute questions if the increased rate on electric bills should be considered a tax increase.

Opponents of Ohio's new energy law are rewriting language that they were going to take to voters to reject a nuclear power bailout. This comes after Attorney General Dave Yost denied their first attempt at summarizing the initiative. 

Several unions representing workers at the state's two nuclear plants are objecting to a new bankruptcy plan by FirstEnergy Solutions, saying the energy generator's latest filing would not honor union contracts.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., participate in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019,
Paul Sancya / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the most recent Democratic presidential debates. Thomas Wood, a political scientist at Ohio State University, joins the show.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The Ohio Attorney General is looking over referendum language filed by a group fighting the state’s new energy law.

power lines near Canel Winchester, Ohio
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio legislators have passed new energy laws that affects everyone’s electric bills and change the state’s course on green energy policies. But it can be easy to get bogged down by all the information contained in the bill, here's a breakdown.

Perry Nuclear Power Plant in Perry, Ohio
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts has filed its first round of signatures with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office to hold a referendum on the law that bails out nuclear plants and scraps green energy policies.

Ohio House

The Ohio House Speaker said opponents of the state’s new energy law will need big money to overturn it.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts is leading the charge for a possible ballot referendum to stop the new energy law that would bail out the state's two nuclear plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies a year.

The Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station on Lake Erie is scheduled to shut down in 2020.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, host Mike Thompson discusses the new state law that bails out two nuclear power plants and scraps renewable energy mandates. Statehouse News Bureau reporter Andy Chow joins the show.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The passage of HB 6 this week not only gave Ohio’s two FirstEnergy Solutions nuclear plants a $150 million subsidy to remain open, it also keeps the communities and school districts relying on those plants' taxes from taking an additional financial hit.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur speaks in Washington, D.C. on July 18, 2018, on the anniversary of the Seneca Falls convention.
Marcy Kaptur / Twitter

Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), who chairs a U.S. House energy and water subcommittee, says that Ohio’s new energy bill is a step in the wrong direction.

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