Energy Bill

Amy Sutherly gathers signatures to put a referendum of HB6 on the 2020 November ballot. She has a brace around her wrist saying she sustained the injury after a counter petitioner hit her.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The campaign around Ohio's nuclear bailout law is intensifying with more reports of people intimidating signature gatherers who want to put the law up for a vote on next year's ballot. The reports of aggression have even captured the attention of Ohio's attorney general.

The group fighting to protect the subsidies for FirstEnergy Solutions has been paying for mailers and ads that use anti-Chinese government rhetoric. 

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose at the Board Of Elections on Sept. 24, 2019.
Nick Evans / WOSU

An effort to circulate petitions to repeal Ohio’s nuclear bailout law known has brought out a high-profile opposition campaign with ads and mailers.

Pention workers for the nuclear power plant bailout are collecting signatures throughout Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Ballot efforts typically ramp up in the weeks before an election. The fight over Ohio’s new nuclear bailout law, though, is in full swing more than a year before a possible vote.

So why the early start? One side says it’s to keep two nuclear power plants from closing, while experts say spending now may be the best investment.

Andy Chow

The League of Women Voters and Common Cause Ohio are joining forces to call out the lack of transparency in the scathing campaign against the nuclear bailout referendum attempt.

This Oct. 5, 2011 file photo shows the cooling tower of the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Amy Sanceta / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss whether the tactics used by a pro-energy bailout group go too far. Ohio State University law professor Dan Tokaji joins the show.

Petition collection clipboard
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Generation Now, one of the well-funded groups in the fight over Ohio's nuclear power plant bailout, is monitoring the referendum petition workers by putting their own people on the ground.

Andy Chow

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the controvertial fliers urging voters not to join the nuclear bailout repeal effort. Carlo LaParo, spokesperson with the group Ohioans For Energy Security, joins the show.

Flickr

While critics of Ohio’s recent nuclear bailout are moving toward a referendum to repeal the law, the new policy has won some support from an unusual source.

A person gathering signatures to put the nuclear power bailout law on next year's ballot called police to report an assault in Dublin. The alleged instigator is accused of working for the opposing group trying to keep the nuclear bailout law, created through HB6, in place.

A group fighting to protect the state law that bails out nuclear power plants is plastering the state with fliers urging people not to sign a petition that would put a rejection of the bailout before voters, connecting the referendum effort to Chinese government interests. 

The Environmental Defense Fund sees Ohio as going in the opposite direction of most other states when it comes to supporting green energy.

A television ad from Ohioans for Energy Security shows this image of Chinese President Xi Jinping.
Ohioans for Energy Security

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss Ohio’s nuclear power plant bailout and the campaign to dimantle it. Gene Pierce, spokesperson with the group Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts, joins the show.

FirstEnergy Solutions, the owner of Ohio's two nuclear plants, is asking the Ohio Supreme Court to stop a potential referendum on next year's ballot. That initiative would hold a referendum on HB6 which bails out FirstEnergy Solutions' two nuclear power plants.

The group Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts, opponents of Ohio’s nuclear power plant bailout law, are one step closer to begin collecting the signatures they need to put a referendum on next year's ballot. 

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