electric cars

There’s a lot up in the air for the new joint venture to build a $2.3 billion electric battery production plant in Lordstown. But companies at least have nailed down a location.

General Motors plans to hold public hearings with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency in March on their proposed battery plant with LG Chem in Lordstown, breaking ground by the spring if permits are secured.

In this Nov. 28, 2018, file photo, snow covers the perimeter of the General Motors' Lordstown plant, in Lordstown, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

General Motors has picked a site to build a new electric battery cell factory in Lordstown, Ohio, next to the site of a former car assembly plant it shut down last year.

Ohioans looking to register their hybrid and electric vehicles will see higher fees at the BMV.

Hybrid owners will now pay $100 and electric vehicle owners will pay $200 to register with the state each year.

Registration for vehicles using only fossil fuels is about $35.

The new fees are part of the state transportation budget signed by Gov. Mike DeWine last April.

A bipartisan bill in the Senate would offer incentives for electric vehicles by creating a $500 sales tax credit for purchase of an EV for personal use and higher tax credits for commercial use.

The GM plant in Lordstown, Ohio, closed in 2019 as part of a massive company restructuring.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

General Motors announced on Thursday a joint venture with LG Chem, a subsidiary of LG Corporation, to create a new manufacturing plant in Lordstown to build high-performing batteries for its fleet of electric vehicles.

Mark Franko, 28-year General Motors employee, holds an American flag as employees gather outside the plant, Wednesday, March 6, 2019, in Lordstown, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

News about a possible buyer for the General Motors plant in Lordstown is generating a lot of interest in Workhorse, the Cincinnati company involved in the deal.

The Smart Columbus Experience Center in downtown Columbus helps promote electric vehicles.
Michael Lee / WOSU

An electric vehicle charging station sits at the corner of City Hall and LeVeque Tower Garage in downtown Columbus. This afternoon, it's empty.

Workers who were recently laid off from General Motors’ Lordstown plant likely will not be among those to benefit from the production of a new electric vehicle (at least not this year), according to GM spokeswoman Cheryl McCarron.

The Prospect Of The Gas Tax

Mar 13, 2019
File Photo / Creative Commons

Governor Mike DeWine has proposed an 18-cents-per-gallon tax increase to help fund road and bridge maintenance and construction. 

The House responded to the proposal with an adjusted increase just under 11 cents per gallon. Next up, the Senate will put its mark on the state transportation budget.

Today on All Sides, we discuss gas tax and its prospects. 

Most American automobiles are powered by internal combustion engines: Gas or diesel goes in, tiny explosions power pistons and turn a crankshaft, the car moves forward, and carbon dioxide goes out.

But a growing chorus of environmental activists, business analysts and auto executives are predicting a sea change as battery-powered electric vehicles grow in popularity.

Road Work Ahead sign
Dennis Brekke / Flickr Creative Commons

The money to pay for ODOT's big road construction projects has run out. So Gov. Mike DeWine has put together a panel to make recommendations on where to find more money - and he wants them to work fast.

The Smart Columbus Experience Center in downtown Columbus helps promote electric vehicles.
Michael Lee / WOSU

Columbus will hold a "Smart Mobility Block Party" and the grand opening of the Smart Columbus Experience Center for the general public on Saturday.

Adora Namigadde / WOSU

For the first time, The Ohio State University on Thurday gave the public a chance to test out electric vehicles for themselves.

Adora Namigadde

Columbus City Council plans to enact a new code on Monday that will allow microtransit vehicles - bigger than cars, but smaller than buses or trains - to operate in the city.

Tim Rudell / WKSU

There’s more than one-way to power an electric vehicle. The one most people are probably familiar with is through batteries. However, there’s another way to generate electricity for cars that, after 40 years in development, is finally becoming more science fact than fiction. And it’s happening in Ohio.

Pages