Electoral College

Heading into Wednesday's joint session of Congress to tally the Electoral College vote results, lawmakers anticipated a long day peppered with objections hinged on baseless allegations of election fraud. More than a dozen Republican senators had said they would object to at least one state's election results.

Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi informed House lawmakers that Congress will reconvene Wednesday night to continue its constitutional duty to count and certify the electoral votes after pro-Trump protestors breached the Capitol and forced Capitol Police to evacuate both the House and Senate.

Electoral College Results Certification

Jan 6, 2021
Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan
Jonathan Newton / The Washington Post via AP, Pool

Thirteen Republican senators and more than 100 House members say they’ll object to certifying Electoral College results today for president-elect Joe Biden.

The certification process is normally a routine, ceremonial affair in Congress but not this year.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks during an interview at the Governor's Residence in Columbus, Ohio on Dec. 13, 2019.
John Minchillo / AP

Ohio’s Gov. Mike DeWine and Sen. Rob Portman both say they oppose the effort by a contingent of Republicans to object to certification of the electoral college results on Wednesday, as part of an unprecedented and ill-fated attempt to overturn the results of the presidential election.

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman will oppose an effort by some of his Republican colleagues to throw out President-elect Joe Biden’s electoral votes when Congress formalizes the presidential election results this week.

Portman announced his decision in a statement Monday, saying he “cannot support allowing Congress to thwart the will of the voters” by overturning Biden’s win.

A battle is looming between congressional Republicans who plan to object to the certification of November's presidential election results, and others who believe Congress needs to accept the will of the voters.

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

A group of Republicans has announced plans to reject presidential electors from states they consider disputed if Congress doesn't create a commission to investigate their claims of fraud. The effort, fueled by baseless allegations of voter fraud, drew support from Vice President Pence by Saturday night.

Updated Tuesday at 11:33 p.m. ET

As President Trump continues to claim falsely that he, and not Joe Biden, won the Nov. 3 presidential election, Congress will meet in a joint session Wednesday to formally count the votes of the Electoral College.

The states have already counted their own electors, and Biden won with 306 to 232 for Trump. Now it's up to Congress to tally the votes as submitted by the states.

Here's a look at how the process is expected to play out:

1. A joint session, presided over by the vice president

Signs and flags at the pro-Trump rally at the Ohio Statehouse on Saturday, November 7, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Ohio's 18 electors were pledged to Donald Trump on Monday in a process prescribed by law and with lots of formality, but little suspense. At the same time, a majority of Electoral College voters across the country cemented the victory of President-elect Joe Biden.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris received the needed majority of votes in the Electoral College on Monday in another step putting them closer toward taking the White House in January.

It was close but in the end, the conservative-led Wisconsin Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Trump campaign's bid to throw out more than 220,000 ballots from two Democratic county strongholds. The move, which came just shortly before Electoral College voters were due to cast their ballots, ensured President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Conservative Justice Brian Hagedorn sided with the court's three liberal members in the 4-3 ruling, finding Trump's legal challenge to change Wisconsin's certified election results "unreasonable in the extreme" and was filed too late.

The certificates of votes signed by Ohio's 18 electors in 2016.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The 538 members of the Electoral College will cast their states’ votes for president today, finalizing the victory of President-elect Joe Biden. With Ohio's election certified last month, the state's 18 electors will again cast their votes for Donald Trump, who won the state by a similar margin as 2016 even as he lost the presidency.

Updated at 9:37 a.m. ET

On Monday, 538 electors in all 50 states and the District of Columbia will cast their votes for president, marking a key next step for Joe Biden as he gets closer to officially becoming the 46th president of the United States.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

It may come and go without much fanfare, but on Tuesday, the U.S. will pass a key deadline cementing President-elect Joe Biden's victory as the 46th president.

The day, Dec. 8, is known as the "safe harbor" deadline for states to certify their results, compelling Congress to accept those results.

Most Americans see Election Day as the end of the long political season aimed at choosing new federal leadership, but it's really only the beginning.

Joe Biden is the president-elect, and Donald Trump’s campaign has presented no serious evidence that would lead a judge to throw out enough votes to reverse the outcome of the election.

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