elective surgeries

The laboratory test kit used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

When Gov. Mike DeWine first spoke about lifting the state's stay-at-home orders, he emphasized that coronavirus testing would be a crucial component of safely reopening.

Like all hospitals in Ohio, Riverside Methodist Hopsital in Columbus has been told to cancel all non-essential and non-elective surgeries.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

May 1 marks the beginning of the re-opening of Ohio. It’s a gradual process, but the first step is to once again allow non-essential surgeries that don’t require an overnight stay or excessive PPE.

People who have put off a medical check-up or procedures due to the coronavirus can begin to make appointments again starting Friday May 1, 2020. There are several changes in store, however, for patients when they arrive for medical visits.

The first phase of Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s reopening plan includes allowing elective procedures and in-person doctor visits. Elective surgeries involving an overnight hospital stay are allowed under some specific conditions, such as if the patient is in extreme pain.

Planned Parenthood clinics in Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada are reporting an influx of patients from Texas, after an order from Texas Gov. Greg Abbott suspending most abortions in that state during the coronavirus pandemic.

Like all hospitals in Ohio, Riverside Methodist Hopsital in Columbus has been told to cancel all non-essential and non-elective surgeries.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

The Ohio Hospital Association is putting together a plan to begin allowing some elective procedures as the state looks to a new stage in its fight against COVID-19.

Like all hospitals in Ohio, Riverside Methodist Hopsital in Columbus has been told to cancel all non-essential and non-elective surgeries.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Health director Amy Acton ordered the cancellation of elective surgeries and procedures, with the goal of preserving personal protective equipment like masks, gloves and gowns, and emptying out hospitals for the projected boom in patients.

Abortion supporters gather outside the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday to rally against the anti-abortion laws in the state.
Sam Aberle / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is ordering abortion clinics to stop all non-essential surgical procedures, prompting criticism from abortion rights groups.

Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton holds up a mask as she gives an update about the state's response to coronavirus, on Feb. 27, 2020 in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio's Department of Health has issued a public health order telling medical centers to stop all elective surgeries and other procedures, in an effort to free up staff and equipment for dealing with COVID-19 coronavirus.