elections

A nonprofit group wants to see more unmarried women, young people and people of color on the nation's voter rolls, so it recently sent 9 million letters urging those groups to register.

But the mailers have upset some election officials, who say they've left voters confused.

The mailers clearly state that they're from the Voter Participation Center or its sister organization, the Center for Voter Information. But the letter inside looks like it could come from the government.

President Trump's legal position welcoming information from foreigners threatens to open Pandora's box in coming elections and nullify one of the key lessons from 2016, critics warned.

"This is setting precedent that is unheard of in our country," said Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. "It's dangerous, dangerous, dangerous."

Local governments across the United States could perform a simple upgrade to strengthen voters' confidence that they are what they say they are: use websites that end in .gov.

Federal officials control the keys to the ".gov" top-level domain, making it less likely that somebody could get one fraudulently and use it to fool people.

Domains that end in .com or .org, meanwhile, could be set up by attackers to try to intercept users seeking information from real sources.

Third-Party Candidates

Dec 6, 2019
Tim Evanson / Flickr

Third-party candidates aren’t new. Even before the modern Democratic and Republican parties staked out their territory in the American political landscape, candidates outside the mainstream have waged challenges to the status quo. 

Most of the time, they lose. 

But they do matter. 

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the history and future of third-party candidates in the American political system.

Guests:

Third Party Candidates

Nov 6, 2019
Tim Evanson / Flickr

Third-party candidates aren’t new. Even before the modern Democratic and Republican parties staked out their territory in the American political landscape, candidates outside the mainstream have waged challenges to the status quo. 

Most of the time, they lose. 

But they do matter. 

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the history and future of third-party candidates in the American political system.

Guests:

John Minchillo / Associated Press

On this Election Day, two Democratic state lawmakers have announced legislation to make future general election days paid state holidays for all Ohio workers.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Monday is the last day for early voting before Tuesday's election. 

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio's next election is scheduled for November 5, 2019. If you want to vote, you need to make sure your name is still on the voter rolls before Monday's registration deadline.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Federal Elections Commission has only three of its six seats filled, so with the 2020 presidential election ahead, it can’t go forward with full investigations or levy fines for campaign finance violations.

COTA

For the first time, the Central Ohio Transit Authority will offer free bus fares for all customers on Election Day.

Women Running For Office

Sep 25, 2019
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at a Service Employees International Union forum on labor issues, Saturday, April 27, 2019, in Las Vegas.
John Locher / Associated Press

The 2018 midterm elections saw a record number of women run for public office. Many of them won the day. 

 

But the long-term outlook for gender parity in public offices is bleak.

 

Women make up more than half of the U.S. population but account for just a quarter of the members of Congress. For women of color, that statistic drops to one in 10.  

 

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: a new guide for women seeking public office.  

 

Guests:

Senators thawed a long-frozen dispute over election security this week with an agreement to provide more funding ahead of Election Day next year — but not as much as some Democrats and outside activists say is necessary.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., agreed to add $250 million for election security after having held up earlier legislation.

The money will be used by the federal government and the states, he said, and in a way that McConnell argues is appropriate for the federal system and without unreasonable new mandates from Congress.

voting booths
John Minchillo / Associated Press

With the ink barely dry on a new settlement between the ACLU of Ohio and the Secretary of State's office, the Ohio Democratic Party is filing its own lawsuit over state’s voter removal process.

Ohio Sec. of State Frank LaRose is implementing a new voter registration form for Ohioans who are about to be removed from the rolls.
Ohio Senate

Ohio's Republican elections chief says the state can handle having its presidential primary on St. Patrick's Day next year if lawmakers make that change in the still-unsettled state budget.

Secretary LaRose (right) showing a resident the new machine at National Church Residences in Columbus.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Ohio's elections chief ordered county boards of elections on Tuesday to undergo a host of security upgrades that he says will guard against cyberattacks and other threats ahead of the 2020 election.

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