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e-cigarettes

Ohio To Spend $4 Million To Curb Vaping

Sep 11, 2019
A man exhales while smoking an e-cigarette.
Robert F. Bukaty / AP

The Ohio Health Department says it will spend $4 million to help curb the use of vaping and e-cigarettes.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that the number of possible cases of severe respiratory illnesses among people who vaped nicotine or cannabis-related products has more than doubled, to 450 in 33 states.

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) is confirming three reports of severe pulmonary illness are likely caused by vaping and it is investigating 11 more suspected cases. That's up from six suspected cases the agency reported less than two weeks ago.

Updated 4:01 p.m., Aug. 23, 2019

Ohio Department of Health (ODH) officials are now asking doctors and hospitals to report any cases of patients with serious respiratory problems that could be connected to vaping to their local health department.  

e-cigarette
Lindsay Fox / Pixabay

A new service launched by the Ohio Department of Health this month offers free, confidential help for people under 18 who are trying to stop using e-cigarettes and tobacco – something that the U.S. Surgeon General calls an “epidemic.”

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) gestures during a discussion about the Ohio Senate version of the budget as President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) looks on.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Republican Senate leaders say the budget they released yesterday is not the final product, but it does represent some of the changes they wanted to make to the House’s spending plan.

E-cigarette Popularity Surges In Rural Classrooms

Jun 11, 2019

North Newton Junior/Senior High lies in the Northwest corner of Indiana, in a county home to more dairy cows than people.

But students have no problem getting e-cigarettes in all shapes and sizes. Some look like pens, others like computer thumb drives.

A public health advocate is pleased Summit County has now banned businesses from selling tobacco products to anyone younger than 21 years old. The legislation, known as Tobacco 21, lessens the chance for teens to get their hands on popular e-cigarettes, Juuls and other paraphernalia.

The director of population health at Summit County Public Health Cory Kendrick said the use of these products among middle and high school students has resulted in the highest rates of  teen tobacco use in years.

Blu/ESPN Magazine

E-cigarettes and vape companies are courting smokers and non-smokers alike, and they have the advertising to match.

Federal regulators want to ban the sale of most flavored e-cigarettes at retail locations like gas stations and convenience stores and require anyone buying e-cigarettes online to verify their age.

e-cigarette
Lindsay Fox / Pixabay

Anti-tobacco groups are calling on lawmakers to raise the tax on products that have been left out of recent increases, such as e-cigarettes and chew. They’re reigniting this call as part of World No Tobacco Day.

The Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday they will take steps to crack down on the sale of e-cigarette products to children and teenagers. More than two million middle and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2016 and that number has continued to grow.

Pixabay

The FDA has ruled that e-cigarettes should be treated like the rest of tobacco products, leading to new regulations that began on Monday. Also, studies are finding that sleep is hugely important in all aspects of children's health.  Additionally, we discuss a variety of issues from foot health, to hemorrhoids.  

Pixabay

E-cigarettes are popular among teenagers, but now the Food and Drug Administration is making the purchase of them illegal to anyone under eighteen years old. Also, researchers are exploring the use of virtual reality to help detect sport concussions. And, new research is discovering how much exercise is enough to get results and whether or not exercise trumps nutrition when it comes to preventing obesity. 

With the rise in popularity of e-cigarettes, the number of small children getting sick from liquid nicotine has increased dramatically. Nationwide Children’s Hospital reports vapor cigarettes account for a 1,500 percent increase in liquid nicotine exposure, since 2012.

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