drug overdose

The RREACT cars are part of a program to provide overdose victims with treatment.
Columbus City Council

Columbus City Council on Monday night approved $371,523 in federal money to help fund a second Rapid Response Emergency Addiction Crisis Team in Franklin County. 

Religious leaders in Stark County are taking new steps in an effort to reduce opioid overdoses.

Participating houses of worship will help distribute naloxone to anyone who needs it.

Naloxone is already available county wide. But some people are not comfortable going into health centers to get the lifesaving drug.

Rev. Walter Moss is president of the Interdenominational Ministerial Association of Stark County and vicinity. He said providing naloxone is about helping the community.

The RREACT cars are part of a program to provide overdose victims with treatment.
Columbus City Council

Columbus City Council recently voted to invest more in an innovative program to help connect people who overdose with treatment.

Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio law permits pharmacists to give the overdose antidote Naloxone without a prescription to people who deal with opioid addiction. One lawmaker is proposing a measure to help ensure pharmacists follow through.

OxyContin pills are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont.
Toby Talbot / AP

The number of fatal drug overdoses in Ohio declined for the first time since 2009, according to state health officials, a milestone in the state's ongoing battle with the deadly opioid epidemic.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine handles a box of Narcan during a news conference on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

U.S. overdose deaths last year likely fell for the first time in nearly three decades, preliminary numbers suggest.

Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Despite the expanded availability of an overdose antidote, Ohio still has one of the highest rates of opioid overdose deaths in the country.

But what happens to someone after they overdose and survive? A new research project from Miami University seeks to answer just that question.

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams made a plea in April for more Americans to be prepared to administer naloxone, an opioid antidote, in case they or people close to them suffer an overdose.

"The call to action is to recognize if you're at risk," Adams told NPR's Rachel Martin. "And if you or a loved one are at risk, keep within reach, know how to use naloxone."

Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Franklin County saw a small dip in overdose deaths in the first quarter of 2018, according to data released by the Franklin County Coroner's Office on Friday.

Naloxone Manufacturer Issues Recall

Jun 5, 2018

Naloxone manufacturer Hospira issued a voluntary recall of its single-use cartridge syringe system for the opioid overdose antidote.

The company says it found loose or embedded particulate matter on the syringe plunger. The recall is on lot numbers 7260LL and 76510LL.

If someone is exposed to the particulate, Hospira says there is a low chance of experiencing adverse health effects including allergic reactions and pulmonary dysfunction.

In a refrigerator in the coroner’s office in Marion County, Indiana, rows of vials await testing. They contain blood, urine and vitreous, the fluid collected from inside a human eye. In overdose cases, the fluids may contain clues for investigators. 


How Many Opioid Overdoses Are Suicides?

Mar 15, 2018

Mady Ohlman was 22 on the evening some years ago when she stood in a friend's bathroom looking down at the sink.

"I had set up a bunch of needles filled with heroin because I wanted to just do them back-to-back-to-back," Ohlman recalls. She doesn't remember how many she injected before collapsing, or how long she lay drugged-out on the floor.

"But I remember being pissed because I could still get up, you know?"

She wanted to be dead, she says, glancing down. A wisp of straight brown hair slips from behind an ear across her thin face.

Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control show the number of opioid overdose deaths is higher in Ohio than all but two other states, and the rate of increase is third in the nation as well.

Accidental deaths in the United States rose significantly in 2016, becoming the third-leading cause of fatalities for the first time in more than a century – a trend fueled by the steep rise in opioid overdoses, the National Safety Council reports.

Accidents — defined by the council as unintentional, preventable injuries — claimed a record 161,374 lives in 2016, a 10 percent increase over 2015. They include motor vehicle crashes, falls, drowning, choking and poisoning, a category that encompasses accidental overdoses.

Julie Eldred has been struggling with addiction to opioids for more than a decade and she says the criminal justice system punishes her for it.

Eldred, a part-time pet caretaker in Acton, Mass., was put on probation last year for theft. She knew staying drug-free would be tough — especially at first, when she was going through opioid withdrawal. But, she says, she didn't have much of a choice.