drug addition

Scales of justice
William Cho / Pixabay

The President of the Ohio State Bar Association, an organization with over 20,000 lawyers and judges among its membership, is speaking out against Issue 1, the statewide November ballot measure aimed at reducing penalties for low-level drug crimes.

OxyContin pills are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont.
Toby Talbot / AP

Ohio’s Bureau of Workers’ Compensation is launching a pilot program to help businesses hire people dealing with addiction of opioids and other drugs. The bureau has earmarked $5 million over two years for the program. 

Prize winners and other observers look on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio, as another $2.4 million is awarded through the Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge.
Julie Carr Smyth / AP

The winners of the second phase the Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge were announced on Wednesday.

Each of the 12 proposals were picked from more than 50 entries submitted worldwide and received $200,000. The winners now have a chance to win a piece of the $8 million that Governor John Kasich set aside for the challenge.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Rich Cordray and Mike DeWine are both making the only statewide issue on the fall ballot a major topic of their campaigns to become governor. This puts an even bigger spotlight on the measure that would scale down prison time for non-violent drug offenders.

opioids and prescription medicine bottle
Flickr

Drug addiction counselors are speaking out against a bill that would send ex-convicts to jail if they fail a drug test. They say this proposal uses the judicial system to solve a health-care crisis.

Pablo Martinez / Associated Press

Local communities who were hoping for new money in President Trump’s public health emergency declaration to fight the addiction crisis were disappointed. There are some initiatives that are giving advocates hope, though.