drug addiction | WOSU Radio

drug addiction

In the 25 years since she snorted her first line of methamphetamine at a club in San Francisco, Kim has redefined "normal" many times. At first, she says, it seemed like meth brought her back to her true self — the person she was before her parents divorced, and before her stepfather moved in.

"I felt normal when I first did it, like, 'Oh! There I am,' " she says.

Jamie Monghan is a prisoner at the Ohio Reformatory for Women. She lives in the Tapestry Unit for women in addiction recovery.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Heroin ran Stephanie Pollock's life. She woke up in the morning with heroin on her mind, her day revolved around it, and everything else including her three kids and her own well-being paled in comparison.

Joan Caleodis, of Martin's Ferry, Ohio, celebrates after making one of the first patient purchases of Ohio's Medical Marijuana program at Cresco Labs CY+ dispensary in Wintersville, Ohio, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019.
Gene J. Puskar / AP

A panel of physicians recommended that the State Medical Board of Ohio vote next month to include anxiety and autism spectrum disorder as qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use.

This week, a federal appeals court addressed the right to treatment for an inmate who suffers from opioid addiction, a move that legal advocates say could have wide repercussions.

Teens from around the state gathered in Columbus for the We Are The Majority rally against drug use.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Thousands of teenagers from around the state gathered in Columbus for a rally against drug use as part of the "We Are The Majority" rally.

Faced with a flood of addicted inmates and challenged by lawsuits, America's county jails are struggling to adjust to an opioid health crisis that has turned many of the jails into their area's largest drug treatment centers.

In an effort to get a handle on the problem, more jails are adding some form of medication-assisted treatment, or MAT, to help inmates safely detox from opioids and stay clean behind bars and after release.

The DeWine administration's public health cabinet is acknowledged at the State of the State address on March 5, 2019 at the Ohio Statehouse.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

In his State of the State speech, Governor Mike DeWine said he will have a team of cabinet members dedicated to dealing with public health including opioid abuse, mental health services and the health of families. That idea is getting good reviews right now.

The opioid epidemic has touched the lives of thousands of people across the Miami Valley. As part of our coverage of the crisis, WYSO wanted to know what our listeners wanted to know. We collected dozens of questions, a lot of them from people wondering how best to help a loved one struggling with addiction or recovery, and how to find support for themselves.

After months of threats, federal prosecutors in Philadelphia launched a legal challenge on Wednesday against the nonprofit Safehouse, which is hoping to open what could be the nation's first site where people with opioid addiction can use drugs under medical supervision.

Vivitrol, a relapse prevention drug.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

It’s a busy morning in Franklin County’s municipal courthouse. People stream through metal detectors, and elbow their way into elevators.

Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during the Ohio State of the State address in the Fritsche Theater at Otterbein University in Westerville, Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich is celebrating a $500,000 donation from Pfizer as a major boost to the Foundation for Appalachian Ohio.

In September 2016, the town of East Liverpool, Ohio, captured national attention when a photo of a local couple's overdose went viral. It showed a woman and her boyfriend sprawled comatose in the front seats of a car, while the woman's 4-year-old grandson sat in the back. The image was originally posted by the local police department. Overnight, East Liverpool, a town of just over 11,000 people, became the face of the opioid crisis enveloping parts of the country.

When Maddy Nadeau was a toddler, her mother wasn't able to care for her. "I remember Mom was always locking herself in her room and she didn't take care of me. My mom just wasn't around at the time," she says.

Every day, her older sister Devon came home from elementary school and made sure Maddy had something to eat.

"Devon would come home from school and fix them cold hot dogs or a bowl of cereal — very simple items that both of them could eat," says Sarah Nadeau, who fostered the girls and later adopted them.

Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Overdose deaths are down in Summit County since a public health emergency was declared one year ago.

Marijuana plants
Jim Mone / AP

An Ohio physician and medial professor believes medical cannabis should be used to treat opioid addiction in a state that saw a record number of overdose deaths last year.

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