driverless cars

Smart Columbus self-driving shuttles are coming to Linden.
Smart Columbus

The Linden Leap autonomous shuttles will stay off the roads until investigators determine what caused one to stop unexpectedly last Thursday afternoon, injuring one passenger.

Mayor Andrew Ginther unveils the LEAP self-driving shuttle  in Linden on Feb. 5, 2020.
Nicole Rasul / WOSU

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther and other local leaders on Wednesday celebrated the launch of electric self-driving shuttles in the Linden neighborhood. It's the second such program in Columbus, but the first in a residential area.

Ohio continues to give the green light to businesses that want to help pioneer the development of self-driving vehicles. Just last week at a COSI conference, Lt. Governor Jon Husted was wooing Toyota, Waymo, Ford, the American Trucking Associations, AAA and others.

Columbus debuted driverless shuttles in a loop around the Scioto Mile in December 2018.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Ohio has received $17.8 million to generate data on self-driving vehicles, an area of research in which the state is already playing a prominent role, according to the state's U.S. senators.

The Transportation Union of America stands in front of a bus stop on North Third Street to protest autonomous buses.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Fully autonomous city buses might be years away, but the coalition People Before Robots is already voicing concerns about safety and jobs.  The statewide group met Thursday night in Linden.

Columbus debuted driverless shuttles in a loop around the Scioto Mile in December 2018.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

It’s a balmy 27 degrees when I wander down to the Scioto River to hop into one of Ohio’s first self-driving shuttles. The green-and-white, six-person van stops at COSI, the National Veterans Memorial and Museum, Bicentennial Park and the Smart Columbus experience center – or at least, that’s the plan.

The Department of Transportation has announced new federal voluntary guidance on the development and use of automated vehicles — with the goal of "removing unnecessary barriers" to innovation.

Nick Evans / WOSU

On the corner of Fifth and Main in downtown Marysville on Thursday, officials from Honda, government types and curious shop workers hoisted cell phones to see a new smart intersection project in action. Every few minutes, a Honda SUV heads toward the intersection and stops short—the driver warned of a pedestrian, emergency vehicle or red light runner.

Driverless shuttles debuted in Columbus in December 2018 as part of the Smart Columbus grant.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Driverless vehicles are coming to Columbus.

The green and white self-driving shuttle unveiled by Smart Columbus on Wednesday morning looks something like a small, rectangular minivan. A lot of windows and the logos of partner organizations decorate its sides - Smart Columbus, DriveOhio, May Mobility. 

The Transportation Union of America stands in front of a bus stop on North Third Street to protest autonomous buses.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

The Transport Workers Union of America has announced the formation of a statewide coalition to stop autonomous buses from hitting Ohio’s streets.

DriveOhio, the state's clearinghouse for autonomous vehicle testing and smart technology, plans to include Interstates I-75 between Cincinnati and Dayton and parts of I-275. It's also helping to further Cincinnati's effort to build a test track for driverless shuttles.

Gov. John Kasich signs an executive order on autonomous vehicle testing at Pillar Technologies in Columbus.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich has signed an executive order opening up any public road around the state for testing for driverless vehicles.

Greater Cincinnati transportation officials want to help drive the future of autonomous and connected vehicles. They are in the early stages of a plan to build a test track and deploy driverless shuttles.

Adora Namigadde

Central Ohio may be investing heavily in driverless trucks, buses and cars, but the Columbus bus drivers’ union says autonomous buses shouldn't run without staff onboard.

Dan Konik / Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio wants to be a leader for the automated vehicles industry. But Gov. John Kasich is warning that as the nation prepares for self-driving cars, it must also prepare for some major consequences.

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