domestic violence

The new CHOICES domestic violence shelter which opened in January and can accomodate up to 120 people and currently has a waitlist of more than 40 people.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Domestic violence-related fatalities in Ohio have spiked over the past year, and some experts partly blame isolation during the coronavirus pandemic.

City Atty. Zach Klein and Columbus Councilmember Shayla Favor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

A sharp reduction in federal funds is cutting into the budgets of organizations that assist survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking around Ohio.

A high-risk domestic violence court starts taking cases Monday in the Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas.

The U.S. Department of Justice is funding the specialized court for three years with $1 million and it will take 50 cases each year.

The court categorizes felony domestic violence cases that involve either strangulation or a firearm as high risk.

Adora Namigadde / WOSU

As Ohio's stay-at-home order continues, Columbus Police reports that domestic violence calls are on the rise. That's spurred the Columbus City Attorney to start offering a texting service to help victims.

The new CHOICES domestic violence shelter which opened in January and can accomodate up to 120 people and currently has a waitlist of more than 40 people.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Sue Villilo directs LSS CHOICES For Victims Of Domestic Violence. At their shelter in Columbus, the phone lines have been less busy these past few weeks.

“We actually have a little bit of a dip in seeking services right now. I think to some extent that isn’t too surprising,” Villilo says. “It’s probably harder for people to contact us if they’re in the home with the abuser.”

City Atty. Zach Klein and Columbus Councilmember Shayla Favor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is expressing alarm after Columbus saw three domestic violence homicides in three weeks. 

Gahanna Police / Facebook

Franklin County prosecutors are pursuing vehicular homicide charges against a man who allegedly crashed a car during a police pursuit while under the influence, killing a passenger.

In February, Rep. Janine Boyd (D-Cleveland Heights) introduced a domestic violence protection law along with several of co-sponsors of the bill.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Rep. Janine Boyd (D-Cleveland Heights) says her high-profile domestic violence bill is gaining momentum in the Ohio House. The bipartisan piece of legislation known as "Aisha's Law" looks to overhaul the way communities and law enforcement respond to reports of assault.

Gahanna Police / Facebook

The Gahanna Division of Police identified a woman who died in a crash Wednesday night following a police chase. Authorities believe Shannon Currier was the victim of felonious assault by the car's driver just days earlier.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, left, shakes hands with Ohio House speaker Larry Householder after delivering the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

This year, Ohio lawmakers managed to send 21 bills to the governor's desk for his signature. However, there are many other proposals that received a lot of attention but are still waiting in the wings for 2020.

Ohio House and Senate Democrats are calling on legislative leaders to pass a slew of bills they believe will reduce domestic violence and protect victims.

City Atty. Zach Klein and Columbus Councilmember Shayla Favor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus this week launched its Intimate Partner Homicide Prevention Project, a federal grant-assisted program designed to overcome hurdles in implementing domestic violence-related gun laws.

Christopher Columbus statue in front of Columbus City Hall.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Columbus City Council on Monday will consider a grant for a probation department program focused on intervention for LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence. 

Cleveland City Council is considering whether to require employers to offer leave for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

At Wednesday’s Safety Committee meeting, councilmembers heard from advocates on the need for employee protections.

Almost everyone who comes to the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center faces a daunting list of obstacles after an incident, Cassie Gaffney, the center's director of government affairs, told council members.

Former wives and partners of servicemen who survived domestic abuse told their harrowing stories before the House Armed Services military preparedness subcommittee as they pressed for more attention to and resources for the growing problem within the armed forces.

"We are here today because domestic violence has become a forgotten crisis in our military," chairwoman Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said in her opening remarks before the military preparedness subcommittee.

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