disease

Daniel Stockman/Flickr

Health officials in Ohio are working with the CDC to investigate a viral, multi-state outbreak traced to the Ohio-based Petland store chain.

We don't usually think of adorable puppies as disease vectors, but they might actually be making people sick. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a Campylobacter outbreak in people and its link to puppies purchased from a chain of pet stores.

This spring and summer may be a doozy for Lyme disease, at least in parts of the Northeast.

"We're anticipating 2017 to be a particularly risky year for Lyme," says Rick Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York.

Ostfeld has been studying the debilitating tick-borne disease for more than 20 years, and has developed an early warning system based on mice. For more on that, check out the piece in our sister blog, Goats and Soda.

Farm animals are increasingly becoming sources of deadly microorganisms like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and that drug-resistant bacteria could be traveling from the farm to your table.

Science Journalist Melinda Wenner Moyer, in an article written for Scientific American, visited three Indiana hog farms last year and witnessed, in two of the cases, crowded barns and special feed laced with antibiotics.

To Test Zika Vaccines, Scientists Need A New Outbreak

Feb 23, 2017

Researchers are eager to test promising vaccines against Zika, the virus that sparked a global health emergency last year.

But uncertainty over whether the Zika epidemic will continue affects researchers' ability to finish testing vaccines. They need locations with an active viral outbreak to conduct large-scale human trials and make sure the vaccine actually protects against disease.

Ten thousand years ago, at the dawn of the agricultural revolution, many of our worst infectious diseases didn't exist.

Here's what changed.

With the rise of agriculture, for the first time in history humans were living in close contact with domesticated animals — milking them, taking care of them and, of course, eating them. All that touching and sharing gave animal germs plenty of chances to get inside us.

Federal health officials may be about to get greatly enhanced powers to quarantine people, as part of an ongoing effort to stop outbreaks of dangerous contagious diseases.

The new powers are outlined in a set of regulations the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published late last month to update the agency's quarantine authority for the first time since the 1940s.

A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there.

Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it takes a trip to the stomach, where there's lots of acid. That stomach acid can break chemical bonds in the antibiotic and deactivate it.

A Superbug That Resisted 26 Antibiotics

Jan 17, 2017

"People keep asking me, how close are we to going off the cliff," says Dr. James Johnson, professor of infectious diseases medicine at the University of Minnesota. The cliffside free fall he is talking about is the day that drug-resistant bacteria will be able to outfox the world's entire arsenal of antibiotics. Common infections would then become untreatable.

Sam Hendren / WOSU

Ohio food safety testers are adding ice cream to the list of items on store shelves that they check for contamination. The change comes as two well-known producers, Blue Bell and Jeni’s, recall frozen products amid concerns about listeria contamination.

Cancer Survival Rates Shockingly Low For Young Adults

Apr 1, 2015
BeitelStrong

Young adults traditionally aren’t the face of cancer. But people between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer at a rate six times higher than children, according to the National Cancer Institute.

In the third part of our three-part series on cancer, we talk with some young people who are stepping up to be a voice for a group of cancer patients that sometimes go overlooked.

“I was in the shower when I found it,” Brittany Beitel, who lives in Hilliard, recalls. It was last April when Beitel found a lump in her breast. “I didn’t really think anything of it.”

11:00 Bubonic plague wiped out nearly half of Europe, but our own continent is no stranger to epidemics. Smallpox decimated the native population; yellow fever, cholera and Spanish flu took out millions more. Now, with the resurgence of polio, ebola, mumps and measles, we'll look at how diseases affect culture and if modern medicine can stop them. Guests

Surviving a Global Flu Pandemic

Mar 15, 2010

What it would be like for a family to try to survive a flu pandemic? With Carla Buckley and The Ohio State University (OSU) veterinary preventive medicine professor Richard Slemons and assistant professor Armando Hoet.

The History of Disease

Oct 27, 2009

The history of the world’s most devastating viruses and humankind’s battle with infectious disease, with Scripps Research Institute professor of immunology and microbial science Michael B.A. Oldstone, M.D.

Pages