discrimination

A Columbus Police officer speaks to protesters during demonstrations over police brutality and racism.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

This is part one of a two-part series about race inside the Columbus Division of Police. Read part two here.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to include comments from Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus, who oversees the Columbus Division of Police. He was interviewed prior to publication, but his comments were erroneously not included in the original story.

A group of 52 Black former McDonald's franchisees is accusing the fast-food giant of discrimination, alleging they were "denied equal opportunity to economic success" compared to their white peers.

Updated 6:15 p.m. ET

More than 1,200 current employees at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have signed a letter calling for the federal agency to address "ongoing and recurring acts of racism and discrimination" against Black employees, NPR has learned.

Updated at 5:52 p.m.

In a historic decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects gay, lesbian, and transgender employees from discrimination based on sex. The ruling was 6-3, with Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's first appointee to the court, writing the majority opinion. The opinion was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and the court's four liberal justices.

Updated at 7:25 p.m.

The Supreme Court's conservative majority signaled Wednesday that it is on the verge of carving out a giant exception to the nation's fair employment laws.

Before the court were two cases, both involving fifth grade teachers at parochial schools in California. One, a veteran of 16 years teaching at her school, contends her firing was a case of age discrimination. The other said she was fired after she told her superior that she had breast cancer and would need some time off.

The U.S. Supreme Court sided with older federal workers on Monday, making it easier for those over 40 to sue for age discrimination.

The 8-to-1 ruling rejected a Trump administration position that sought to dramatically limit the legal recourse available to federal workers.

The new coronavirus doesn't discriminate. But physicians in public health and on the front lines say that in the response to the pandemic, they can already see the emergence of familiar patterns of racial and economic bias.

In one analysis, it appears doctors may be less likely to refer African Americans for testing when they show up for care with signs of infection.

Voters cast their ballots at the Cincinnati Public Library's polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Crime, drugs and guns top the list of social issues most concerning to African Americans in Ohio, according to a statewide poll released Wednesday.

At the heart of a story now playing out in schools, workplaces and courts across the U.S. is a disagreement over the legal meaning of the word "sex" — and whether discrimination against gay and transgender people for being gay or transgender is sex discrimination.

Deborah Dugan, the suspended head of the Recording Academy, made many stunning allegations in her discrimination complaint filed Tuesday with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, left, shakes hands with Ohio House speaker Larry Householder after delivering the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

This year, Ohio lawmakers managed to send 21 bills to the governor's desk for his signature. However, there are many other proposals that received a lot of attention but are still waiting in the wings for 2020.

Report Highlights Racial Disparities In Local Lending

Dec 24, 2019

Communities of color face more difficulty getting loans from banks regardless of income level, according to a new report from the Western Reserve Land Conservancy. The report found mixed results from three banks aiming to improve lending practices in underserved communities.

Jeremiah Miller, a biracial man, found different experiences with police when they listed his race as "black" compared to when they listed him as "white."
Albert Cesare / Cincinnati Enquirer

Followed in a public park and forced to leave. Cuffed and questioned for whistling while waiting for a bus. Pulled over for spending too much time at a gas station.

Some black drivers and pedestrians in Cincinnati say they’ve been unfairly stopped and questioned by police. 

Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a long-awaited set of cases testing whether the federal law that bars sex discrimination in employment applies to LGBTQ employees.

Specifically, the question is whether employers are free to fire employees because they are gay or transgender.

Workplace Discrimination In The U.S.

Oct 4, 2019
Wikimedia Commons

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost in August joined the Trump Administration in arguing that federal civil rights laws do not protect LGBTQ employees against discrimination in the workplace.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act forbids, among other things, discrimination against workers based on sex. What that means, exactly, will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in October. 

Today on All Sides, workplace discrimination protections and Ohio’s role in the cases at hand.

  

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