disaster relief | WOSU Radio

disaster relief

FEMA inspectors conduct damage assessments in Trotwood, where several large apartment complexes were destroyed in the tornadoes.
April Laissle / WYSO

Tornadoes that destroyed and damaged hundreds of homes in western Ohio are complicating population counts for next year's Census.

Residents of some tornado-damaged properties in Harrison Township have issued words of warning to prospective looters.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Tornado cleanup continues in Harrison Township, where three twisters touched down on Memorial Day, leaving wreckage from one end of the township to the other.

Repair and cleaning efforts begin on a neighborhood damaged by a tornado storm system that passed through the area, destroying homes and cutting off access to utilities, Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Cleanup continues from Memorial Day tornadoes that pummeled parts of Ohio, including the village of Roseville, where Federal Emergency Management Agency will operate a disaster recovery center beginning Wednesday.

Additional Federal Emergency Management Agency disaster recovery centers are expected to open Wednesday in Beavercreek and Celina to assist people in Greene and Mercer Counties affected by the Memorial Day tornadoes. 

Another is expected to open soon in Eastern Ohio this week as well.
 

The centers will be staffed by federal experts from FEMA and the United States Small Business Administration to offer storm survivors assistance with temporary living expenses, uninsured home repairs, and other urgent needs.

The first of several FEMA disaster recovery centers opens Saturday in Trotwood. 

Agents from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the United States Small Business Administration will be on hand at the center to help survivors of the Memorial Day tornadoes with information about disaster assistance. 

The Trotwood center will be open to Miami Valley homeowners, renters and small-business owners affected by the storm, and include experts from Ohio, and Dayton-area agencies to help connect survivors with the services they need to get back on their feet.

Rebuilding after last month’s tornado disaster will take at least two years, say Montgomery County emergency officials, who held a summit in hard-hit Trotwood Wednesday with dozens of other government, religious and community groups to begin mapping out the county’s longterm recovery plans. The meeting was organized ahead of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's anticipated return to the Miami Valley by this weekend.

The 10 Ohio counties impacted by the Memorial Day tornado outbreak are now eligible for federal disaster recovery aid. Dayton-area officials say the FEMA and other funding could play a crucial role in the Miami Valley’s ongoing recovery.

President Donald Trump issued a federal disaster declaration Tuesday, one week after Gov. Mike DeWine formally requested it.

The declaration means affected Ohioans are now eligible for aid through FEMA’s individual assistance, hazard mitigation, and disaster legal services programs.

Asa Holzschuh's family arrived at it house at 3:30 am. They spent the morning cleaning of the remain's of his neighbor's roof outside of Laurelville, Ohio, after a tornado tore through their property.
Olivia Miltner / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine says Ohio has received federal assistance for residents of 10 counties impacted by tornadoes, severe storms, straight-line winds, flooding and landslides.

Montgomery County Aims To Recycle Tornado Debris

Jun 18, 2019

Cleanup continues in many neighborhoods hard hit by a series of tornadoes on Memorial Day.  Montgomery County officials are striving to recycle as much of the debris as possible rather than send it directly to landfills.

Most yard waste and untreated scrap wood can be turned into mulch when brought to the Montgomery County Solid Waste Transfer and Recycling Facility in Moraine where it is ground up on-site and delivered to local companies to sell as mulch.

Tenants of the storm damaged Kelly Avenue apartments in Old North Dayton were ordered Tuesday to vacate their homes by the end of the week. The news panicked residents, many of whom have nowhere else to go.

More than two weeks after the Memorial Day tornadoes, the Red Cross is meeting individually with displaced people to assess their needs.

Officials say the goal is to make the recovery process less overwhelming for affected families.

“I want my people to come back home, because the city of Trotwood is a family."

That's what one speaker told a large group of individuals and organizations that have, for almost two weeks now, focused on recovery efforts in the aftermath of a tornado outbreak that cause massive damage this past Memorial Day.

The gathering took place Friday at Sinclair Community College where the groups involved assessed the work they've done so far, and discussed how to take their recovery efforts to the next level.

When storms ravaged parts of Ohio during Memorial Day weekend, several libraries were forced to close their doors for a short time. Those facilities are back in operation. And many libraries are serving in relief efforts now.

Miami Valley officials are only beginning to calculate the longterm impacts of the devastation from last week’s tornado outbreak. Key is an investigation by FEMA to determine whether Ohio is eligible for emergency aid.

Officials caution it’s a complicated process that will take time. To see it in action, WYSO’s April Laissle followed one FEMA team into a particularly hard-hit area of Trotwood.

At the Westbrook Village Apartment Complex, a group of FEMA investigators walk through muddy grass holding clipboards, taking stock of what’s left.

Last week’s Memorial Day tornadoes affected more than 200 businesses across Montgomery, Greene and Mercer Counties.

It’s unclear exactly how many people are out of work as a result of the disaster. Economic development officials are coordinating with city and county officials in hard-hit areas in an effort to identify displaced workers, and to help businesses whose employees are missing work as a result of storm damage to their homes or apartments. 

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