Diabetes

Craig Miller, who has Type 1 diabetes, stores insulin in a refrigerator in his garage.
FARAH YOUSRY

Economic problems caused by COVID-19 hit diabetics especially hard. The American Diabetes Association says about a quarter of people with the disease are tapping savings, loans or stimulus checks to buy insulin. And some are taking big risks to get the life-saving drug.

The pandemic has left millions of Americans without jobs, and as a result, nearly 14 million people lost employer-sponsored health insurance.  For the one-in-10 Americans with diabetes, this poses a potentially life-threatening problem. 

William and Angela Rentel both contracted COVID-19 this spring. William had a stroke six months after recovering.
Jacob Dean / Side Effects Public Media

This is part two of a two-part series on COVID-19 and diabetes. Read part one here.

William Rentel, a nurse practitioner in Ohio, has Type 1 diabetes but kept his blood sugar well-managed. That changed when he and his wife contracted COVID-19 this spring.

COVID-19 And Diabetes Make For A Dangerous Mix

Dec 22, 2020
Agatha Walston, a nurse with Type 1 diabetes, was hospitalized with COVID-19 in April.
Farah Yousry / Side Effects Public Media

This is part one of a two-part series on COVID-19 and diabetes. Read part two on Wednesday.

Agatha Walston leads a busy life. She’s a nurse in southern Indiana and a single mother of two young kids.

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif.
Reed Saxon / AP

Thirty-four million Americans are estimated to have diabetes and some 88 million, about one in three adults, are thought to be prediabetic.

Diabetes can complicate infection from COVID-19 in more ways than one, especially if blood glucose levels are high.

Wellness Wednesday: Sleep Apnea

Jan 15, 2020
Man hitting alarm clock in bed.
Acharaporn / Pexels

New research shows that sleep apnea may increase the risk of mood disorders like anxiety and depression.

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif.
Reed Saxon / AP

Diabetics who depend on insulin to live often find themselves paying hundreds, sometimes more than $1,000 a month, for that medication. A new bill would limit that out of pocket cost to $100 for a one month supply.

Angela Lautner knew her thirst was unusual, even for someone directing airplanes, outside in the Memphis summer heat.

"We had coolers of Gatorade and water for people to always have access to," Lautner remembers of her job as a ground services agent. "But the amount of thirst that I felt was just incredible."

She had no appetite and she lost an unusual amount of weight. Then after a trip to the emergency room, Lautner, who was 22, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. The diagnosis was life changing.

pshutterbug / Flickr

A fresh food prescription program called Produce Connect is showing promising results at reducing food insecurity and improving health outcomes.

Ohio State Wexner Medical Center

An Ohio State doctor has shown a hormone called aldosterone can lead to Type 2 diabetes. The effect is even more pronounced for African- and Chinese-Americans.

Nicole Smith-Holt’s son Alec was 23 when he started feeling sick. His muscles cramped. He was lethargic. He woke up multiple times every night to use the bathroom. After two weeks, Smith-Holt encouraged him to go to urgent care.

Jeff St. Clair / WKSU

Meredith Balogh does a quick inventory of her diabetes survival pack.

“We’ve got insulin pens: these are a fast acting and a long acting,” Balogh says. “We’ve got extra lancing devices for checking your blood sugar; glucose meter, strips for that.”

diabetes blood sugar testing
Pixabay

An Ohio lawmaker says more needs to be done to help Ohioans who suffer from diabetes so he’s proposing a bill he thinks will develop a foundation for progress to battle the disease.

The Blue Diamond Gallery

Today at 11am

In the wake of our nationwide opioid epidemic, scientists explain how addiction manifests in adults and complicates the lives of infants born from drug abusing parents. Then, a look at emerging technologies that will make diabetes screening easier, safer, and eliminate the need to draw blood.

deodorant on a store shelf
Clean Wal-Mart / Flickr

Everybody sweats, but most people feel uncomfortable with the odor that can result from underarm perspiring. However, antiperspirants and deodorants might have ingredients that cause negative health effects. Today we'll discuss how antiperspirants and deodorants work, how "Dancing Kevin" lost over 150 pounds and more.

Guests:

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