Dayton | WOSU Radio

Dayton

FEMA inspectors conduct damage assessments in Trotwood, where several large apartment complexes were destroyed in the tornadoes.
April Laissle / WYSO

Tornadoes that destroyed and damaged hundreds of homes in western Ohio are complicating population counts for next year's Census.

Dayton, hard hit by the opioid crisis, is battling back. The latest help comes from a Google Alphabet company called Verily, which is piloting an addiction treatment program it may scale nationwide.

Tenants of the storm damaged Kelly Avenue apartments in Old North Dayton were ordered Tuesday to vacate their homes by the end of the week. The news panicked residents, many of whom have nowhere else to go.

More than two weeks after the Memorial Day tornadoes, the Red Cross is meeting individually with displaced people to assess their needs.

Officials say the goal is to make the recovery process less overwhelming for affected families.

United States Sen. Sherrod Brown is requesting federal funds to help Dayton recover some of the city's costs associated with security for the May 25 Klan rally. In a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, Brown wrote the city spent more than $650,000 to ensure the safety and security of people and property during, "the potentially volatile event.”

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says that while the city did not ask Brown to make the request, she's thankful for the help.

“I want my people to come back home, because the city of Trotwood is a family."

That's what one speaker told a large group of individuals and organizations that have, for almost two weeks now, focused on recovery efforts in the aftermath of a tornado outbreak that cause massive damage this past Memorial Day.

The gathering took place Friday at Sinclair Community College where the groups involved assessed the work they've done so far, and discussed how to take their recovery efforts to the next level.

Miami Valley officials are only beginning to calculate the longterm impacts of the devastation from last week’s tornado outbreak. Key is an investigation by FEMA to determine whether Ohio is eligible for emergency aid.

Officials caution it’s a complicated process that will take time. To see it in action, WYSO’s April Laissle followed one FEMA team into a particularly hard-hit area of Trotwood.

At the Westbrook Village Apartment Complex, a group of FEMA investigators walk through muddy grass holding clipboards, taking stock of what’s left.

Last week’s Memorial Day tornadoes affected more than 200 businesses across Montgomery, Greene and Mercer Counties.

It’s unclear exactly how many people are out of work as a result of the disaster. Economic development officials are coordinating with city and county officials in hard-hit areas in an effort to identify displaced workers, and to help businesses whose employees are missing work as a result of storm damage to their homes or apartments. 

Special teams from the Federal Emergency Management Agency arrive in Ohio Tuesday to begin assessing the damage from last week’s tornado outbreak.

The storm damaged thousands of homes and businesses across the Miami Valley and FEMA’s visit is a critical step toward securing federal disaster assistance, but officials say it could take weeks before any potential disaster aid comes to Ohio.

Over the weekend, thousands of volunteers helped clean-up Dayton neighborhoods damaged by Memorial Day’s tornado outbreak.

Roadways once closed due to storm debris reopened in much of the city over the weekend. Power has been restored to all but about 2,000 residents.  Hundreds remain without gas service.

Dozens of buildings are no longer habitable, including at least two apartment complexes. Some affected residents are staying with friends or family members. About 130 people have moved into emergency shelters.

Several Dayton organization are asking for volunteers to aid in disaster relief efforts this weekend, following Monday night’s devastating tornadoes. Here’s how you can help:

The Living City Project is sponsoring a clean-up at locations throughout the Miami Valley. Those interested in participating must sign up here.

Volunteers are asked to meet at the following locations at 8:30 a.m.:

Dayton Area

DeWine Seeks FEMA Aid For Tornado Victims

May 31, 2019
Celina Mayor Jeffrey Hazel, Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio First Lady address the media the morning after an EF3 tornado killed one resident and left 40 with uninhabitable homes.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Gov. Mike DeWine is requesting help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for 10 counties that suffered damage from the tornadoes that ripped through Ohio earlier this week.

My hometown – Dayton, Ohio – deserves credit for a lot of things over the years: powered flight, the cash register, Huffy Bicycles, the pop-top soda can and hundreds of other inventions.

But Dayton and its surrounding communities rarely get the credit they deserve.

In Dayton, tens of thousands of people remain without water and electricity. Dozens more are staying in emergency shelters. Red Cross officials say that number is likely to grow as storm recovery continues after Monday’s tornado outbreak in Indiana and Western Ohio that left one person dead and injured dozens more.

Businesses in and around Dayton are still dealing with a lack of electricity and water, after Monday night's tornadoes. Rahn's Artisan Breads stopped operations Monday night when the lights went out. Owner Rahn Keucher says his ovens run on electricity, and he hasn't been able to find a generator powerful enough to run his freezers and ovens.

Pages