Dayton

A week ago, the Dayton Sewing Collaborative was cancelling events and closing the doors to its studio space because of the coronavirus pandemic. That changed on Friday when the group launched a brand-new project producing face masks for the community.

More than 30 Dayton sewists are currently putting together colorful face masks at their homes. 

Updated Friday, 10:00 a.m.

On Tuesday, UC Health began offering drive-thru screening and testing for COVID-19, but only with a doctor's referral. On Wednesday, the hospital issued a statement announcing it would limit drive-thru testing to the "most urgent and critical needs."

Restaurants and bars across the Miami Valley are preparing for what could be an indefinite shutdown. On Sunday in an effort to slow the spread of Coronavirus, Gov. Mike DeWine temporarily banned sitdown service.

The order allows takeout and delivery to continue. And it extends unemployment benefits to affected workers without paid leave. And many business owners in Dayton’s restaurant industry are urging workers to take advantage of the help.

Police Departments from all over the country are calling on Dayton for active shooter training. They recognize that Dayton officers were able to take down Connor Betts thirty seconds after they got the call in a shooting that could have been much worse. Nine people were killed and more than two dozen were injured on August 4, 2019.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Montgomery County has rejected a permit from a Ku Klux Klan group that wanted to hold another rally in Dayton.

Police officers in riot gear stand on Third Street as a small Indiana Klan group rallied in Courthouse Square in 2019..
Jess Mador / WYSO

The KKK-affiliated, Indiana-based hate group that rallied in Dayton last year has applied for a permit to do it again this fall.

When a tornado tore through Old North Dayton on Memorial Day, one of the buildings destroyed was the neighborhood's last affordable, full-service grocery store.

Eight months later, that family shop is still working to reopen, so the neighborhood association and a local ministry are offering residents free rides to the nearest supermarket. WYSO News Reporter Jason Reynolds went shopping with them.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine says he wants state lawmakers to pass his plan on gun violence by the end of this year.

In 2008, GM closed its manufacturing plant in Dayton, Ohio, sending the community into a tailspin. Workers who had been unionized at GM struggled to find jobs that paid close to the wages the plant had paid.

"After that GM plant closed, things were so hard for so long," Ohio-based filmmaker Steven Bognar says. "People lost their homes. The jobs you could get were at the Kohl's distribution center or Payless Shoes warehouse distribution center or fast food. People were making $9 an hour."

The Federal Communications Commission has granted the Dayton Daily News’ owner more time to find a new buyer. The extension could keep the newspaper operating seven days per week.

The future of the paper has been in question since last year when a private equity firm bought Cox Media Group’s Ohio newspaper, radio and TV stations.

Soon after the Cox Media Group purchase, Apollo Global Management said it would cut publication of the Dayton Daily News to three days per week.

The announcement sparked an immediate outcry from many Daytonians.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is criticizing a recent Federal Communications Commission decision approving the more than $3 billion acquisition of Cox Media by a private equity firm.

In an editorial in USA Today Thursday, Whaley and Michael Copps, a former FCC commissioner, say the deal paves the way for Dayton to lose its daily newspaper, a move proposed by the company Apollo Global Management last fall.

Ohio Senate president Larry Obhof is defending income tax cuts in their version of the budget, which must be finalized by this weekend.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine says one of his top priorities in 2020 is to push his package of gun and mental health law changes, which he introduced after the August mass shooting in Dayton. But both Republican and Democratic leaders in the Ohio Senate suggest that might be an uphill battle.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Even after a deadly mass shooting in Dayton appeared to flip the gun conversation in Ohio, 2019 comes to a close with legislators having done little on the issue of gun control.

Seven months since the Memorial Day tornadoes left a path of devastation across the Miami Valley, some residents in Old North Dayton are struggling to return to normal and many homes that suffered damage in the storm remain covered with tarps or sit in disrepair.

After the Memorial Day tornado outbreak, many Old North Dayton residents donated to their neighborhood association instead of giving to regional or national groups such as the Red Cross or the Dayton Foundation.

It’s been almost seven months since an outbreak of tornadoes caused tens of millions of dollars in damage, displacing hundreds of people across the Miami Valley. 

Since then, an army of government agencies, volunteers and advocates have been working to help restore hard-hit communities and assist survivors.

One December event organized by two partnering churches was designed to provide a boost to storm-affected families ahead of the holidays.

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