Dayton

The Federal Communications Commission has granted the Dayton Daily News’ owner more time to find a new buyer. The extension could keep the newspaper operating seven days per week.

The future of the paper has been in question since last year when a private equity firm bought Cox Media Group’s Ohio newspaper, radio and TV stations.

Soon after the Cox Media Group purchase, Apollo Global Management said it would cut publication of the Dayton Daily News to three days per week.

The announcement sparked an immediate outcry from many Daytonians.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is criticizing a recent Federal Communications Commission decision approving the more than $3 billion acquisition of Cox Media by a private equity firm.

In an editorial in USA Today Thursday, Whaley and Michael Copps, a former FCC commissioner, say the deal paves the way for Dayton to lose its daily newspaper, a move proposed by the company Apollo Global Management last fall.

Ohio Senate president Larry Obhof is defending income tax cuts in their version of the budget, which must be finalized by this weekend.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine says one of his top priorities in 2020 is to push his package of gun and mental health law changes, which he introduced after the August mass shooting in Dayton. But both Republican and Democratic leaders in the Ohio Senate suggest that might be an uphill battle.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Even after a deadly mass shooting in Dayton appeared to flip the gun conversation in Ohio, 2019 comes to a close with legislators having done little on the issue of gun control.

Seven months since the Memorial Day tornadoes left a path of devastation across the Miami Valley, some residents in Old North Dayton are struggling to return to normal and many homes that suffered damage in the storm remain covered with tarps or sit in disrepair.

After the Memorial Day tornado outbreak, many Old North Dayton residents donated to their neighborhood association instead of giving to regional or national groups such as the Red Cross or the Dayton Foundation.

It’s been almost seven months since an outbreak of tornadoes caused tens of millions of dollars in damage, displacing hundreds of people across the Miami Valley. 

Since then, an army of government agencies, volunteers and advocates have been working to help restore hard-hit communities and assist survivors.

One December event organized by two partnering churches was designed to provide a boost to storm-affected families ahead of the holidays.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine speaks during a public inauguration ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Columbus.
Ty Greenlees / AP/Dayton Daily News, Pool

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss how Ohio's representatives in Congress voted on articles of impeachment against President Trump. Plus, an interview with Gov. Mike Dewine about his first year in office.

Roughly 200 people rallied in front of Republican Congressman Mike Turner’s office Tuesday in downtown Dayton in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump.

A coalition of Dayton anti-Trump groups organized the protest to coincide with similar so-called “Nobody Is Above the Law” rallies held in cities across the United States ahead of Wednesday’s expected House vote on impeachment.

Here’s what some protesters at the gathering had to say.

The Old North Dayton Neighborhood Association is organizing a new effort to transport residents to nearby grocery stores after a tornado ripped apart the area's only full-service grocery. The neighborhood was among the hardest-hit in the Miami Valley Memorial Day tornado outbreak.

Stacy Meyers works at Evans Bakery in Old North Dayton. The mother of five also lives in the neighborhood and says she’s been spending $50 to $100 more on food for her family each week since the tornado destroyed the Grocery Lane store.

State Attorney General Dave Yost is calling for the release of the Oregon District mass shooter’s Bellbrook-Sugarcreek student records. 

Yost filed a so-called “friend-of-the-court” brief in the Ohio Supreme Court asking it to overturn an earlier lower-court decision to keep the records private.

Yost’s brief supports a coalition of news outlets that includes Cox Media Group, Scripps, WDTN, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Associated Press, The New York Times, CNN and ABC News that is suing to make the records public. 

The announcement of Cox Media Group’s expected sale to private equity firm Apollo Global Management and it’s holding company, Terrier Communications, has some local lawmakers, community advocates and media analysts concerned about a decline in local and regional journalism.

Dayton, Ohio, is a city that is used to getting knocked flat on its back.

People across the Miami Valley are continuing to clean up from the Memorial Day tornadoes. Among the strongest of the outbreak’s 15 twisters was an EF4 tornado that carved a path of destruction just north of downtown Dayton.

It hit Montgomery County’s Harrison Township especially hard, leaving almost 2,000 properties damaged. Now, six months after the storm, signs of recovery are visible in the small community. But for many Northridge residents, full recovery remains a far-off dream.

Sounds of construction fill the air in Northridge.

More than four dozen people affected by the Dayton mass shooting have received a monetary gift from the Oregon District Tragedy Fund. The Dayton Foundation and members of a special committee overseeing the fund Monday announced the distributions, that took place last week.

The Tragedy Fund was established just hours after the mass shooting on Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019 outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District. It included a total of 5,061 individual charitable gifts. As of November 13, 2019, committee members say, the fund totaled $3,822,463.01.

A 24-year-old man accused of helping the Dayton mass shooter has pleaded guilty to illegally possessing firearms and lying on a federal firearms form.

Ethan Kollie from Kettering appeared Wednesday in Dayton Federal court.

As part of his guilty plea Kollie acknowledged lying on a United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Form 4473 when purchasing a micro Draco pistol. He denied using illegal drugs when authorities say Kollie used marijuana and psychedelic mushrooms, an admission that would have prevented the sale from going through.

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