David Niven

In February 2016, nine months before the presidential election that produced the Trump presidency, President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a respected federal appeals court judge, to replace a conservative justice of the Supreme Court, Antonin Scalia, who died suddenly that month.

Four years ago, then-Ohio Gov. John Kasich was technically the host of the Republican National Convention since it was taking place in downtown Cleveland, part of his home state.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaking at The City Club of Cleveland, in Cleveland on Dec. 4, 2018.
Tony Dejak / AP

Former Ohio Governor and 2016 Republican presidential candidate John Kasich will be speaking at the upcoming Democratic National Convention for likely nominee Joe Biden. While Ohio Democrats are criticizing the choice, there are reasons they could benefit from Kasich's appearance.

Yes, Donald Trump won Ohio by eight percentage points in 2016 on his way to an electoral college victory.

No, his re-election campaign is not taking Ohio for granted in 2020.

Ohio is used to getting a lot of attention when it comes to electing presidents. But some now question its status as a bellwether state for the future.  

Ohio usually predicts the winner in presidential elections. But University of Cincinnati political science Professor David Niven thinks that might not be the case this year.

“In this particular election, we may have slipped from our perch.”