Curious Cbus

You've got questions. We've got reporters. Let's find answers together.

That's the idea behind Curious Cbus. You submit your burning questions about our region and we’ll work on getting answers, together, through the resources of 89.7 NPR News, WOSU TV, and the WOSU Digital Media teams.

Here's the process:

  1. You submit a question
  2. You vote for your favorite question
  3. We report the story, together

So what are you curious about? Submit your question, vote on what we should investigate next, and see what we've dug up so far.

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In this Oct. 10, 2018, file photo, a voter casts their ballot on the first day of early voting at the Hamilton County Board of Elections in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Now that the 2020 election is right around the corner, candidates for president and Congress are crisscrossing the state of Ohio, flooding the airwaves and raising money.

This year, I’ll be devoting a big chunk of time to following how the 2020 elections play out in Central Ohio. But I need your help.

State Psychiatric Hospital Cemetery sign in olumbus
David Holm / WOSU

In Columbus' Hilltop neighborhood, if you know where to look, there are two small cemeteries with plaques that say they are the final resting place for patients from an old insane asylum.

Map depicting American Indian trails in Ohio from the book "Archeological Atlas of Ohio," by William C. Mills
Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society / Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

Before Europeans settled here, Ohio was home to many different indigeonous cultures. From the Adena and Hopewell people, who constructed massive earthworks such as the Serpent Mound, to the Lenape or Delaware people, who were forced from their lands on the East Coast by expanding colonies.

Gnashes30, timz2011, Sam Howzit / wikimedia, flickr

WOSU's Curious Cbus project asks listeners and readers to submit questions and help us decide what stories to cover next. Now is your chance to choose your favorite question about our region.

Cecily King, right, and her daughter Odessa hang a sign that says "If You're Going Through Hell Keep Going" over a Columbus highway.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

You are enough. You are valuable. You are worthy.

Mantras like these have been appearing on highway overpasses and bridges across Columbus over the last few months.

Desiree Buechner was the only person at the Ohio State Fair I met who thought Columbus had an accent.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Steve Pickett is fascinated by accents. “It tells you a lot about somebody,” he says.

A Cleveland native, Pickett moved to Columbus a decade ago for business school at The Ohio State University. After arriving, however, he was struck more by what he didn’t hear.

Scenic rollercoaster in Minerva Park, which was open from 1895 to 1902.
Columbus Railway Company / Columbus Metropolitan Library

On Columbus’s North East side, there is one residential area that doesn't look or feel like any of the surrounding neighborhoods. It's called Minerva Park, and it's actually an enclave completely surrounded by municipal Columbus.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine has rolled out a 17 point plan to address gun violence in the wake of a mass shooting in Dayton. Legislative leaders are already warning proposals like new background checks and a so-called "red flag law" could be a tough sell with their members.

As part of our Curious Cbus series about guns in Ohio, several listeners wanted to know how much the NRA—and other gun groups—donate to Ohio lawmakers.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

William Wood answers the door to his suburban Columbus home with a Glock 19 on his hip. His two toddler-aged children, Daisey and Wesley, peak out from behind his legs.  

A no firearms sign in Tempe, Arizona.
Cory Doctorow / Flickr

As part of WOSU's Curious Cbus project, we asked our audience to submit their questions about guns in Ohio. Pretty quickly a theme emerged: Many listeners wanted to know where you can—and can’t—legally carry a firearm. 

gun in holster
Eric Gay / Associated Press

Following a series of mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, WOSU asked our audience for their questions about guns in Ohio.

The Red Men Sioux Tribe No. 128 in the Old North is actually a social club that dates back to the 1700s.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Caitlin McGurk lives in Clintonville. Every day on her way into work, she passes a sign on High Street in the Old North: "Red Men Sioux Tribe No. 128."

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

After two mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, Texas, the public conversation has turned once again to guns – and what legislators can do to reduce gun violence.

Elizabeth Heiser holds the concretion she found in her garden.
Michael De Bonis / wosu

In Columbus' Clintonville neighborhood, Elizabeth Heiser was working in her backyard when she made an unusual discovery. While removing some unwanted bushes, she found an almost perfectly sphere-shaped rock. 

Amtrak pulling out of Chicago's coach yard and maintenance facility.
Loco Steve / Flickr

Train travel may seem like an outdated mode of transportation to some, but it still has many advocates. Countries in Europe and Asia continue to invest in train infrastructure while support in the U.S. has faltered. Many cities, including Columbus, no longer have passenger rail service at all.

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