Curious Cbus | WOSU Radio

Curious Cbus

You've got questions. We've got reporters. Let's find answers together.

That's the idea behind Curious Cbus. You submit your burning questions about our region and we’ll work on getting answers, together, through the resources of 89.7 NPR News, WOSU TV, and the WOSU Digital Media teams.

Here's the process:

  1. You submit a question
  2. You vote for your favorite question
  3. We report the story, together

So what are you curious about? Submit your question, vote on what we should investigate next, and see what we've dug up so far.

_

_

_

_

Scenic rollercoaster in Minerva Park, which was open from 1895 to 1902.
Columbus Railway Company / Columbus Metropolitan Library

On Columbus’s North East side, there is one residential area that doesn't look or feel like any of the surrounding neighborhoods. It's called Minerva Park, and it's actually an enclave completely surrounded by municipal Columbus.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine has rolled out a 17 point plan to address gun violence in the wake of a mass shooting in Dayton. Legislative leaders are already warning proposals like new background checks and a so-called "red flag law" could be a tough sell with their members.

As part of our Curious Cbus series about guns in Ohio, several listeners wanted to know how much the NRA—and other gun groups—donate to Ohio lawmakers.

A no firearms sign in Tempe, Arizona.
Cory Doctorow / Flickr

As part of WOSU's Curious Cbus project, we asked our audience to submit their questions about guns in Ohio. Pretty quickly a theme emerged: Many listeners wanted to know where you can—and can’t—legally carry a firearm. 

Eric Gay / Associated Press

Following a series of mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, WOSU asked our audience for their questions about guns in Ohio.

The Red Men Sioux Tribe No. 128 in the Old North is actually a social club that dates back to the 1700s.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Caitlin McGurk lives in Clintonville. Every day on her way into work, she passes a sign on High Street in the Old North: "Red Men Sioux Tribe No. 128."

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

After two mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso, Texas, the public conversation has turned once again to guns – and what legislators can do to reduce gun violence.

Elizabeth Heiser holds the concretion she found in her garden.
Michael De Bonis / wosu

In Columbus' Clintonville neighborhood, Elizabeth Heiser was working in her backyard when she made an unusual discovery. While removing some unwanted bushes, she found an almost perfectly sphere-shaped rock. 

Amtrak pulling out of Chicago's coach yard and maintenance facility.
Loco Steve / Flickr

Train travel may seem like an outdated mode of transportation to some, but it still has many advocates. Countries in Europe and Asia continue to invest in train infrastructure while support in the U.S. has faltered. Many cities, including Columbus, no longer have passenger rail service at all.

The restaurant scene in Columbus is diverse and vibrant, with culinary destinations appreciated across the county. Decades ago, choices for dining out were much more limited, but there are stil some truly exceptional establishments in Columbus' foodie history.

Columbus has had more rain this year than even Seattle. That's led to some rain delays for the Columbus Clippers.
Columbus Cilppers / Facebook

While we are well-warned about April showers, rain is persisting well into May, with another soggy weekend in the forecast for Central Ohio.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Off-year elections don't often get a lot of attention from voters. Even less notice is paid to primary elections in an off-year. But Ohio voters will decide on many significant issues on May 7, in addition to selecting the candidates that will campaign through November.

Columbus Metropolitan Library

Central Ohio is filled with parks where it’s common to see joggers and bicyclists making use of trails. Decades ago, it would have been just as likely to see horseback riders trotting on those very same paths.

WOSU's Curious Cbus project depends on listeners and readers to submit questions and help us decide what stories to cover next. Now is your chance to choose your favorite question about odd places around Columbus.

pigeons
Couleur / Pixabay

When you visit large cities like San Francisco, Chicago or New York, pigeons are a common sight. You’ll find them nesting on window sills, walking on sidewalks and congregating in public parks.

If you don’t see them in person, the evidence of pigeons will be obvious in the droppings they leave behind, covering once-dignified statues and monuments.

The Columbus Zoo recently lost its Asian elephant calf to an infection.
Grahm S. Jones / Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

At the end of last year, the Columbus Zoo faced the loss of three giraffes and an Asian elephant calf over the span of six weeks. The deaths were unconnected, and zoo officials say an external review committee found there was nothing they could have done to save the animals.

Pages