culture

All Sides Weekend Arts and Culture: Holiday Specials

Nov 22, 2019
Jessica Lewis / Pexels

Today on All Sides Weekend with Christopher Purdy, a preview of the holiday sounds around the city, and more. 

Guests:

The Evolution of Black Television

Oct 25, 2019

The Emmy-award winning series When They See Us was groundbreaking in depicting the systemic ills of the criminal justice system to the Central Park Five-who were all men of color.

The show follows a recent trend in television with black leads, which feature a wide array of stories that depict more dramatic, socially conscious themes. 

The evolution from shows such as Good Times of the 1970’s and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air of the 1990’s, to blackish and Queen Sugar of today shows a progression in messaging and themes.

All Sides Weekend: Arts and Culture

Oct 25, 2019
color photo of Ohio Theatre interior with Morton organ console
D.R. Goff / Columbus Association for the Performing Arts

Join guest host Christopher Purdy as he talks with a panel of experts about the latest in arts and culture around Columbus. 

As One, a thought-provoking story about Hannah, a transgender woman, and the reality of human nature is November 8 through 9 at the Southern Theatre.

 

Guests:  

The Evolution Of Black Television

Oct 7, 2019
Flickr

The Emmy-award winning series When They See Us was groundbreaking in depicting the systemic ills of the criminal justice system to the Central Park Five-who were all men of color.

The show follows a recent trend in television with black leads, which feature a wide array of stories that depict more dramatic, socially conscious themes. 

The evolution from shows such as Good Times of the 1970’s and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air of the 1990’s, to blackish and Queen Sugar of today shows a progression in messaging and themes.

Desiree Buechner was the only person at the Ohio State Fair I met who thought Columbus had an accent.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Steve Pickett is fascinated by accents. “It tells you a lot about somebody,” he says.

A Cleveland native, Pickett moved to Columbus a decade ago for business school at The Ohio State University. After arriving, however, he was struck more by what he didn’t hear.

Artist Sophie Lindsey is on the hunt for the funniest joke in town. She got the idea after reading an article calling Cincinnati the least funny city in America.

All Sides Weekend: Día de los Muertos

Oct 19, 2018
Marco Mora-Huizar / flickr

Halloween and the two days after is known as Day of the Dead in Latino cultures. The holiday celebrates deceased ancestors with food, drink, dancing, and parades. The holiday is most closely associated with Mexico, but it's celebrated throughout Latin America.  Latin Arts for Humanity is hosting an event at Green Lawn Cemetery in honor of the holiday. That includes special food, offerings for the deceased, and music and dancing to honor those who have passed. Today on All Sides, Dia de los Muertos on All Sides Weekend with Clare Roth. 

Pixabay

Join us today as we broadcast live from the 2018 Columbus Arts Festival downtown. We'll discuss the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance and how the 1920s cultural revolution affected Columbus. We'll be joined by leaders of local arts organizations, as well as by one of the performers taking part in both the festival and Columbus's Harlem Rennaisance anniversary project.

Hugh Hefner created Playboy at his kitchen table in Chicago. The magazine was blamed for (or credited with) setting off a cultural revolution in America, but within a few years Hefner was branded a male chauvinist. He was a proponent of free speech and a champion of civil rights who was decried as a merchant of smut.

Hefner died Wednesday at the age of 91, the magazine announced in a statement, writing that he "peacefully passed away today from natural causes at his home, The Playboy Mansion, surrounded by loved ones."

The History, Culture and Identity of the Midwest

Aug 18, 2017
tpsDave / Pixabay

Today at 10am 

The Midwest used to be considered the moral heartland of the United States. Over the years it lost this title and became known as "flyover country." The coastal denizens came to denigrate the values and steadiness of the region and that has influenced the work of historians since the 1920.

We hear from Jon Lauck, author of From Warm Center to Ragged Edge: The Erosion of Midwestern Literary and Historical Regionalism, 1920-1965.

The History, Culture and Identity of the Midwest

Jul 10, 2017
tpsDave / Pixabay

The Midwest used to be considered the moral heartland of the United States. Over the years it lost this title and became known as "flyover country." The coastal denizens came to denigrate the values and steadiness of the region and that has influenced the work of historians since the 1920.

 

We hear from Jon Lauck, author of From Warm Center to Ragged Edge: The Erosion of Midwestern Literary and Historical Regionalism, 1920-1965.

 

Last week, the New York Times published an op-ed titled "In Defense of Cultural Appropriation" in which writer Kenan Malik attempted to extol the virtues of artistic appropriation and chastise those who would stand in the way of necessary "cultural engagement." (No link, because you have Google and I'd rather not give that piece more traffic than it deserves.) What would have happened, he argues, had Elvis Presley not been able to swipe the sounds of black musicians?

ohiostatehouse.org

The board that oversees the Ohio Statehouse will mark the 15th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks by again installing 2,977 U.S. flags on the Statehouse lawn.

Thomas Edison is getting ready to leave Ohio and take his spot at the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall.

A bronze statue of the inventor holding a light bulb has been displayed at the library in his hometown of Milan ahead of its installation in Washington. A member of the state's Edison statue commission tells the Sandusky Register that the figure will be packed up Friday to start the trip.

Thomas Bradley / WOSU News

Researchers at Ohio State University say food waste is a serious problem in America. Yet nearly half of the people they recently surveyed don’t think they contribute to food waste, and many believe they’re doing the right thing by throwing food away. 

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