Cory Booker

With supporters calling it more than 100 years in the making, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved legislation on Wednesday that makes lynching a federal hate crime for the first time in U.S. history.

The Emmett Till Antilynching Act was approved in a vote of 410-4. Three Republicans and one independent representative voted against it.

Sen. Cory Booker announced Monday he is dropping out of the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

In an email to his supporters, Booker cited a number of reasons: most notably, a lack of money to continue.

"Our campaign has reached the point where we need more money to scale up and continue building a campaign that can win — money we don't have, and money that is harder to raise because I won't be on the next debate stage and because the urgent business of impeachment will rightly be keeping me in Washington," Booker wrote.

Democratic presidential candidate entrepreneur Andrew Yang responds to questions following a Democratic presidential primary debate at Otterbein University, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019, in Westerville.
Tony Dejak / AP

Two of the Democrats and one Republican running for president have failed to be certified for Ohio's spring primary ballot. One will be a write-in candidate though. 

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden, left, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., center and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speak during a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by CNN/New York Times at Otterbein University.
John Minchillo / AP

Fourteen candidates have filed for the Democratic primary for Ohio's 2020 primary ballot, and there will also be a Republican challenger to President Donald Trump on that ballot.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., participate in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019,
Paul Sancya / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the most recent Democratic presidential debates. Thomas Wood, a political scientist at Ohio State University, joins the show.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The second night of the Democratic debates in Detroit did not stray from its predicted script: It was open season on front-runner Joe Biden right from the start.

But it was also something of a free-for-all, with every candidate for himself or herself. And the intensity and outcome of the exchanges may have come as a surprise to some of the people onstage.

The first leg of the second round of Democratic presidential debates is over, and now it's on to Night 2.

Center stage features former Vice President Joe Biden, who has a lot on the line. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey has been promising attacks on Biden's racial justice record, and Biden is promising to not be as "polite" as he was in the last debate. Night 1 also drew a bold line between moderates and progressives onstage.

Former Vice President Joe Biden (left) and President Donald Trump (right)
Associated Press

A new Quinnipiac University Poll shows Democratic Former Vice President Joe Biden is the only Democrat in the race who would beat Republican President Donald Trump if the election were held today.

Updated at 6:05 p.m. ET

Eight Democratic presidential candidates faced the same basic question today in Houston: Why should women of color vote for them?

The first-ever She The People Presidential Forum — organized by and centered on questions from women of color — served as a repeated reminder of the key role that minority women play in Democratic politics.

One of the possible contenders in the 2020 presidential race was in Northeast Ohio over the weekend to drum up support for Rich Cordray in the race for governor.

“This is not actually about blue or red or right or left right now: we are at a point in America where this is about right or wrong.”