Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

  • The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.
  • Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.
  • The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

WOSU's Curious Cbus project wants to hear from Ohioans: What questions do you still have about COVID-19? What aspects of Ohio's response are you curious about?

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A sign is displayed at Planned Parenthood of Utah Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019, in Salt Lake City.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

Many of Ohio’s doctors are already using telehealth to connect to their patients, especially during this COVID-19 pandemic. Now, Planned Parenthood says it is going to do the same thing for some of its services.

Columbus Police vehicles outside the division headquarters.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus Police report violent crimes in the city are on the rise, which officials link to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Brazil, the second worst country in the world for COVID-19 cases, is getting some help from Cincinnati. The new non-profit Venti-Now will send ventilators there for free that it designed, built and tested in just three weeks. Tanzania is also on the list to get them.

Fresh off a Caribbean cruise in early March, John Campbell developed a cough and fever of 104 degrees. He went to his primary care physician and got a flu test, which came up negative.

Then things got strange. Campbell says the doctor then turned to him and said, "I've called the ER next door, and you need to go there. This is a matter of public health. They're expecting you."

It was March 3, and no one had an inkling yet of just how bad the COVID-19 pandemic would become in the United States.

Nearly 130,000 people in the United States have died from the coronavirus and more than 2,800,000 people have been infected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The state is rolling out a new public health advisory system to identify counties experiencing a higher spread of coronavirus. Gov. Mike DeWine hopes the new notification system can drive policies to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

Gov. Mike DeWine in front of the advisory alert system ranking the severity of coronavirus outbreaks across Ohio, on July 2, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine has announced a series of health guidelines for Ohio's K-12 schools when they reopen in the fall.

Columbus joined several other Ohio cities in requiring masks in public spaces. The Columbus mask mandate begins Friday. Akron may soon follow.

“This is about science. This is not about politics,” said Akron Ward 5 councilwoman Tara Mosley-Samples.

“I think that they have politicized it so much that we are ignoring the science here, and the science says we have a problem,” said Samples.

Cincinnati City Council will meet in a special session Friday to discuss passing a mask ordinance. Mayor John Cranley says it's in response to rising numbers of COVID-19.

Mayor Andrew Ginther tours the Greater Columbus Convention Center.
Greater Columbus Convention Center

Mayor Andrew Ginther says he will sign an executive order that requires the wearing of face coverings in public. The order takes effect throughout Columbus on Friday, July 3, ahead of the holiday weekend.

The Dayton City Commission has unanimously passed a law requiring people to wear masks. It's a dramatic attempt by the city to stem the spread of the coronavirus as the state's economy reopens.

The city ordinance goes into effect this Friday, July 3, at 8 a.m. The law requires people to cover their nose and mouth when inside public places, or even when outside when social distancing isn't possible. Failure to comply will be enforced by Dayton Police officers, who are empowered to issue $85 citations.

Brandon Duncan describes himself as fearless. So when he first heard news reports about the novel coronavirus, the 30-year-old wasn’t afraid for himself. 

“I’m like, how is this going to affect Danny?” he says.

Pennsylvania officials announced Wednesday that residents must wear face coverings when outside the home, the latest in a series of mask mandates in various states to combat the spread of COVID-19.

So you want to wear a face mask? Good call.

A growing body of evidence supports the idea that wearing face masks in public, even when you feel well, can help curb the spread of the coronavirus — since people can spread the virus even without showing symptoms. That's the main reason to wear a mask: to protect other people from you.

Daycare
Magda Ehlers / Pexels

A new report from a group of business leaders shows many Ohio companies cannot get back on their feet because their employees no longer have affordable daycare options.

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