Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

Follow along with the latest updates on our liveblog.

WOSU is providing a daily COVID-19 Updates at the end of PBS NewsHour, Mondays through Thurday. Watch Now.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.

Health officials made the following recommendations to protect yourself from illness:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; dry hands with a clean towel or air dry hands. 
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap and water are unavailable. 
  • Cover your mouth with a tissue or sleeve when sneezing or coughing. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. 
  • Stay home when you are sick. 
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

WOSU Classroom and PBS Kids offers a guide on healthy habits and how to talk to your kids about coronavirus.

Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.

The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks as Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton (left) and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted look on.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A stay-at-home order has been issued for Ohio residents, which will go into effect on Monday at 11:59 p.m. As part of the new directive, all non-essential businesses have been ordered to close. 

Updated at 7:39 p.m. ET

The future of a coronavirus aid package that's likely to top $1 trillion is in limbo following the failure of a necessary procedural vote in the Senate.

The measure, which required 60 votes to pass, garnered just 47 votes on Sunday evening, with Democrats refusing to back the Republican-led plan. Democrats are calling for changes to the legislation, including further expansion of unemployment insurance and more restrictions on federal assistance provided to large corporations.

University Hospitals is approved to begin clinical trials of an antiviral drug that could possibly help treat COVID-19 patients. UH will receive the antiviral Saturday.

This is part of a series looking at pressing coronavirus questions of the week. We'd like to hear what you're curious about. Email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions."

The global spread of COVID-19 cases continues, with cases around the world and increasingly strict measures to control its spread. Authorities in the U.S. and other countries have banned or discouraged large gatherings and are urging social distancing and frequent hand-washing.

Now-Lt. Gov. Jon Husted speaking at the Columbus Chamber of Commerce Government Day in Cincinnati, Ohio on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio’s unemployment numbers have been staggering. Claims have skyrocketed close to 140,000 in the first four days of the week as bars, restaurants, salons, movie theaters, and a whole host of other businesses close during the pandemic. 

The interior of St. Patrick's Catholic Church while it was open for limited silent prayer earlier this week. Friday, Bishop Robert Brennan announced all parishes should close their doors effective immediately.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

A priest dressed in purple Lenten robes stands behind an altar and recites the opening prayer of the Catholic mass. “In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,” begins Father Daniel Dury. 

A lone cameraman responds, “Amen.”

The U.S. economy has never hit the brakes quite like this before.

While the course of the coronavirus pandemic is unpredictable, forecasters are using their economic models and making some educated guesses about just how bad the damage will be. The forecasts are not pretty:

  • Oxford Economics expects the U.S. economy to shrink at an annual rate of 12% between April and June.
  • JPMorgan Chase sees a second-quarter contraction of 14%.

Gov. Mike DeWine inside the Governor's Residence in Columbus on Dec. 13, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The first coronavirus death has been confirmed in Ohio.

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Education announced new K-12 and higher education policies in response to disruptions caused by the coronavirus.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

The White House sought to show that it's in control of the sprawling coronavirus crisis on Friday even as it acknowledged enduring shortfalls in key supplies.

Administration officials also said they're imposing new controls on travel and restricting passage through the northern border with Canada and the southern border with Mexico following agreements with those governments.

Here were some key points from the latest briefing.

Too few tests

Component Repair Technologies in Mentor hasn't experienced a reduction in business due to COVID-19, but is experiencing challenges with state guidance, such as working from home or taking employees' temperature.
Google Earth

While Ohio schools, restaurants, and salons are among those closed to enforce social distancing, many manufacturers are still open for business.

Answering Coronavirus Questions

Mar 20, 2020
A caregiver tests a patient for coronavirus at University Hospitals, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

The number of Ohioans infected by the coronavirus that causes the COVID-19 disease is steadily increasing.

As the virus spreads, so do the questions about the disease.

The Ohio National Guard helped out with recovery efforts in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria in October 2017.
Sgt. Joanna Bradshaw / Ohio National Guard

The Ohio National Guard is being deployed to help with the state’s coronavirus response. But the guard’s leader wants to make it clear what they will not be doing.

Unemployment Insurance Claims Office sign
Bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

It probably comes as no surprise that unemployment claims in Ohio have skyrocketed this week as businesses continue to temporarily close and lay off workers to try to slow the spread of coronavirus.

Dave Hatfield is a barber and an independent contractor.
Courtesy of Dave Hatfield

Dave Hatfield is a barber, and his wife is a stylist. He says he was hit hard by news that Ohio would close all barbershops, beauty salons, tattoo parlors and spas.

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