Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

  • The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.
  • Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.
  • The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

WOSU's Curious Cbus project wants to hear from Ohioans: What questions do you still have about COVID-19? What aspects of Ohio's response are you curious about?

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COSI's first ever Science Festival will be held May 1-4.
COSI

COSI has scrapped its plans to reopen Wednesday and decided to remain closed due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic.

The U.S. has reported more than 3 million coronavirus cases as of Wednesday morning, with all but a handful of states struggling to control outbreaks of COVID-19. One million of those cases have been confirmed over the past month — part of a wave of infection that began after many states started to reopen their economies in May.

Updated 3:40 p.m. ET

In the latest move from the Trump administration to push for states to reopen schools this fall, Vice President Pence couched guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on how to safely reopen schools, saying it shouldn't be used as a "barrier" to students returning to classrooms.

Ohio State Rep. Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland)
John Minchillo / AP

The leader of Ohio Legislative Black Caucus is the first Ohio lawmaker known to be diagnosed with COVID-19. State Rep. Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland) says she’s experiencing mild symptoms since being diagnosed a couple of days ago.

A growing number of governors and mayors are working to slow the spread of the coronavirus by requiring people to wear masks in public places.

Experts say these public health rules will reduce the risk of people getting sick. But some local police and sheriffs are refusing to enforce the rules.

"COVID-19 is not going away. In fact, it's getting worse," warned Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, when he announced his state's mask mandate ahead of the July Fourth weekend.

The Indiana Women’s Prison has taken hard measures to contain the coronavirus. Many inmates in the prison have spent long periods locked in their cells — which have no toilets, running water or air conditioning — with limited opportunities for relief. 

As temperatures rise over the summer months, advocates and those with loved ones inside certain housing units, known as the cottages, worry about the heat and long periods of confinement. They fear it could cause health problems for the inmates, and say that the treatment amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. 

Nearly three quarters of all confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio have been in nursing homes. Ohio National Guard personnel have been helping with testing in long term care facilities, but the funding for them to continue that and other pandemic related missions runs out in a month.

Dave Yost speaks at the Ohio Republican Party event, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Yost was elected as the next Ohio attorney general.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is pushing back on a new Columbus ordinance that requires face coverings in public, saying the requirement can't extend to state lawmakers. 

Gov. Mike DeWine and First Lady Fran DeWine wearing face masks on June 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine announced the Ohio Department of Health will issue a public health order requiring face masks in public in seven counties where the spread of COVID-19 is considered most severe.

Columbus City Hall on April 15, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus City Council on Monday night voted to add penalties to the city's face covering mandate. The ordinance replaces an executive order issued last week by Mayor Andrew Ginther, and requires residents over the age of 6 to wear facial coverings in all public spaces.

A closed sign is posted at Pins Mechanical duckpin bowling alley and bar in downtown Columbus.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

An extra 20 weeks of unemployment compensation will be made available to eligible Ohioans once they have exhausted their other benefits.

Ohio Attorney General and Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine reviews his prepared comments ahead of a primary election night event, Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio.
Bryan Woolston / Associated Press

A company partly owned by Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is among those that received loans from a $600 billion-plus coronavirus aid program.

This spring, as it became clear COVID-19 was hitting African-Americans especially hard, Indianapolis-area health officials vowed to set up testing sites in “hotspot” neighborhoods. One opened in predominantly Black Arlington Woods, at a respected local institution: Eastern Star Church.

A sign on the Columbus Metropolitan Library's downtown branch, on May 4, which remains closed.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus Metropolitan Library will again close their doors to the public because of the spike in COVID-19 cases. 

A waitress wipes down a table at a cafe in Gahanna with outdoor seating.
Darrin McDonald / WOSU

WOSU is providing updates about the coronavirus and COVID-19 in Ohio. Find the most recent news and information below.

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