Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

Follow along with the latest updates on our liveblog.

WOSU is providing a daily COVID-19 Updates at the end of PBS NewsHour, Mondays through Thurday. Watch Now.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.

Health officials made the following recommendations to protect yourself from illness:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; dry hands with a clean towel or air dry hands. 
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap and water are unavailable. 
  • Cover your mouth with a tissue or sleeve when sneezing or coughing. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. 
  • Stay home when you are sick. 
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

WOSU Classroom and PBS Kids offers a guide on healthy habits and how to talk to your kids about coronavirus.

Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.

The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

Market Volatility Amid Coronavirus

Mar 25, 2020
Stock market board
Ahmad Ardity / Pixabay

Lawmakers early this morning reached an agreement on a bipartisan, $2 trillion economic relief package intended to keep the nation from falling into recession because of the Covid-19 outbreak.

College dorm rooms around the state as well as hotel rooms could be converted into hospitals to treat coronavirus patients.
Ohio State University

There are so many coronavirus patients being treated by medical professionals in New York that makeshift tents have been turned into hospitals. Ohio's leaders say they are planning ahead but aren’t looking to do something similar here.

Lt. Gov.-elect Jon Husted speaks with Gov.-elect Mike DeWine looking on.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio's stay-at-home order is now in effect and many non-essential businesses are closed. However, there are still a number of businesses that remain open, which could raise concerns for workers. 

Ohio Senate and Ohio House signs at the Ohio Statehouse.
Dan Konik / Statehouse News Bureau

Lawmakers have a lot to do in the two days they’ve planned to be at the Statehouse this week – picking a new date for the delayed Ohio primary, setting a later state tax filing day and scrapping mandatory school testing for this academic year. 

Paradise Garage co-owner Emily Monnig. The bike shop has shifted to a curbside model amid the COVID-19 outbreak.
Nick Evans / WOSU

A slow but steady stream of people pass through Beechwold Hardware in Clintonville. On the floor in front of the counter, the owners have put down yellow tape to maintain social distancing between customers and workers.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine is seen in February in Cleveland.

To help contain the spread of coronavirus, Gov. Mike DeWine's stay-at-home order will last for at least a couple of weeks. But Ohioans can still leave the house to take care of essentials like getting food, medicine or exercise. They can also head to the bank.

As many businesses close for the coronavirus epidemic, the Franklin County Board Of Commissioners is offering some new assistance.

President Donald Trump stands with gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine as he speaks during a rally, at the IX Center, in Cleveland, Monday, Nov. 5, 2018.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine on Tuesday threw some cold water on President Trump's remarks that the U.S. should "reopen" for business by mid-April.

At least one Cleveland program that addresses homelessness is ending its winter shelter program early, as shelters across the region face low staffing and high exposure risks during the coronavirus pandemic

The Metanoia Project provided overnight shelter at three locations until March 23, but is now suspending operations.

“It was a hard decision, nothing that we wanted to do, and we wish we could have stayed open longer,” said Metanoia Project Executive Director Heidi Goblirsch. “But unfortunately, if you don’t have proper staffing, we can’t properly serve our guests.”

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

In his Tuesday afternoon briefing with the coronavirus task force, President Trump couched earlier comments about the need to reopen the U.S. economy within weeks, emphasizing that the decision would ultimately be data driven and made in consultation with public health experts.

The president said he still wants Americans working again by Easter Sunday, something he first said during a virtual town hall with Fox News earlier in the day. But he was much more circumspect over whether that would be possible from a medical standpoint.

As COVID-19 begins to hit jails and lockups around the country, the Trump administration is coming under growing pressure to release elderly and other particularly vulnerable inmates in the federal prison system to mitigate the risk of the virus' spread.

Already, three inmates and three staff at federal correctional facilities across the United States have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons. In detention centers at the state and local level, including in New York City's jail system, confirmed cases of COVID-19 are on the rise.

Updated at 1:27 p.m. ET

A Senate agreement on a third wave of emergency funding to address the coronavirus could be "hours" away, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Tuesday, as Republicans and Democrats seemed close to bridging disagreements that have stalled a deal on the approximately $2 trillion package.

Rawpixel / Pexels

Many daycare centers will be closing Wednesday under new rules by the Ohio Department of Health. Starting Thursday, March 26, the daycare providers will need a "temporary pandemic child care license" to continue.

An ODOT sign in Columbus tells drivers to "stay home."
David Holm / WOSU

WOSU is providing updates about the coronavirus and COVID-19 in Ohio. Find the most recent news and information below.

Pages