Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

Follow along with the latest updates on our liveblog.

WOSU is providing a daily COVID-19 Updates at the end of PBS NewsHour, Mondays through Thurday. Watch Now.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.

Health officials made the following recommendations to protect yourself from illness:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; dry hands with a clean towel or air dry hands. 
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap and water are unavailable. 
  • Cover your mouth with a tissue or sleeve when sneezing or coughing. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. 
  • Stay home when you are sick. 
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.

WOSU Classroom and PBS Kids offers a guide on healthy habits and how to talk to your kids about coronavirus.

Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.

The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

color photo of Scott Woods watching Tower Duo perofrm on a computer screen
Scott Woods / Streetlight Guild

Gov. Mike DeWine’s implementation of a statewide ban on large gatherings has put many Columbus-area musicians, at least temporarily, out of work during the coronavirus pandemic.

But thanks to a new online live concert series, the music will go on.

Amazon has closed a warehouse in Shepherdsville, Ky., until April 1, after several workers there tested positive for the coronavirus — the first prolonged closure of a facility confirmed by the company.

Workers in at least 10 other warehouses across the country have tested positive for COVID-19, prompting shorter temporary closures for sanitation and cleaning.

Dr. Amy Acton, with Gov. Mike DeWine alongside, talks to reporters before the statewide coronavirus summit.
Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

The number of COVID-19 deaths in Ohio increased by 50% as the state unveiled an upgraded dashboard with more details on the spread of the coronavirus. The Ohio Department of Health announced Thursday that 15 people have died, five more from the day before.

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

President Trump told governors his administration is working on publishing guidelines for state and local governments to use to determine whether to increase or relax social distancing rules to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

The announcement came ahead of the White House's regular news conference on its response to the pandemic.

A new poll found Ohioans approve of Gov. Mike DeWine’s response to the coronavirus pandemic so far.

Administered by Baldwin Wallace University, the poll looked at attitudes of registered voters ahead of the 2020 election in four Midwestern states: Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Researchers originally aimed to assess attitudes on racism, sexism and environmentalism, said Baldwin Wallace Community Research Institute Assistant Director Lauren Copeland, but pivoted to focus on the coronavirus at the last minute.

A caregiver tests a patient for coronavirus at University Hospitals, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

As Ohio logs hundreds of new coronavirus cases every day, concerns are growing about the state's hospital systems and their ability to handle an expected influx of patients. 

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What is it about outbreak stories that capture the popular imagination?

The bill that made some changes across state law related to coronavirus also set a new ending for the Ohio primary, after polling places were shut down just hours before election day.

Volunteers at the May Dugan Center in Ohio City handed out food, clothing and fresh produce to 1,747 people at the outreach organization's drive-thru pantry Wednesday. According to the center's Director of Development Brenda Saridakis, that's about four times the number of people who usually turn out for their monthly pantries.

 “Last week alone, we had over a hundred people calling asking how they can get food," she said. "We’ll take phone calls, and we’ll do whatever that we can to help every individual.”

The streets of downtown Columbus, here at Broad and High, are empty as all non-essential businesses in the state are closed on March 25, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

This week’s stay-at-home order has pared back much of Central Ohio’s economic activity. But local businesses and non-profits are looking for ways to keep the gears turning.

Online platforms have "an ethical obligation" to root out price gouging on hand sanitizer and other high-demand products during the coronavirus pandemic and beyond, top law enforcement officials from across the country say.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a Culinary Union hall Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019, in Las Vegas.
John Locher / Associated Press

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is pushing the Trump administration to mobilize domestic manufacturers towards COVID-19 efforts.

The number of coronavirus cases has grown 25% in the last day, with two more deaths added to the eight announced yesterday. And the state is starting to release more information about the data they're getting on COVID-19 in Ohio.

At a time when the nation is desperate for authoritative information about the coronavirus pandemic, the country's foremost agency for fighting infectious disease outbreaks has gone conspicuously silent.

"I want to assure Americans that we have a team of public health experts," President Trump said at Tuesday evening's coronavirus task force briefing — a bit of reassurance that probably would not have been necessary if that briefing had included anyone from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Woman running
Daniel Reche / Pexels

The COVID-19 pandemic has interrupted how Ohioans work, eat, go to school, and more, but that doesn’t mean they should give up on working out.

Regular exercise supports the immune system and is a potent stress reliever. Research suggests that in a pandemic, the right amount of exercise is not too little and not too much.

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