Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

  • The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.
  • Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.
  • The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

WOSU's Curious Cbus project wants to hear from Ohioans: What questions do you still have about COVID-19? What aspects of Ohio's response are you curious about?

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Updated at 8:37 p.m.

President-elect Joe Biden outlined his plans for economic relief from the coronavirus crisis on Thursday, citing the need for a more robust vaccination plan as well as for additional direct payments to American families to help recover the U.S. economy. His plan, called the American Rescue Plan, is expected to cost $1.9 trillion.

Columbus Public Health on Parsons Avenue.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus and Franklin County health officials are preparing for phase 1B of the coronavirus vaccine rollout, which the state says will begin next week.

Ohio hasn't seen a "dramatic surge" in new COVID-19 cases related to the holidays, according to the governor. But Mike DeWine says there has been an upswing. Hamilton County is now at "purple," the highest level on the state's color coded map tracking several different benchmarks. 

At 8 a.m. Friday, Ohioans can go to Coronavirus.Ohio.gov and search by county or zip code to find a location that is offering the vaccine for COVID-19, Gov. Mike DeWine announced during a Thursday briefing.

As COVID-19 deaths and illnesses mount, essential workers — who are denied the chance to work from home — are struggling to stay safe. And it's far from clear whether the federal government is doing enough to protect them, according to a former top federal workplace safety official.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration official, Deborah Berkowitz, said the Trump administration has neglected COVID-19 safety at meatpacking plants and many other workplaces.

Crown Pointe Care Center resident Rebecca Meeker, left, receives a COVID-19 vaccine from Dr. Kate Latta, PharmD, Friday, Dec. 18, 2020, in Columbus, Ohio. Meeker was the first long-term care patient in Ohio to receive a vaccine.
Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

The next round of vaccines will be phased in over the next three weeks and go to Ohioans age 80 and older. But supplies are limited initially, with just 100,000 doses a week available.

Vaccine distribution within Hamilton County has been slow, mainly due to the amount of vaccines the county has received.

Hamilton County Public Health receives roughly 500 doses each week. Hamilton County Commissioner Denise Driehaus said the county doesn’t have enough COVID-19 vaccines to finish Phase 1A of the state's vaccine distribution plan.

Ohio State employee Lauren Chisholm, left, receives a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination from Robert Weber Monday, Dec. 14, 2020, in Columbus.
Jay LaPrete / AP

Ohio State Wexner Medical Center doctors have identified new strains of COVID-19 in Ohio, one with a mutation identical to the virus spreading rapidly through the United Kingdom. 

Beating back the pandemic may come down to simple math: getting enough people vaccinated.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, says the country will likely need a vaccination level of between 70% and 90% to reach herd immunity.

Vaccines will be available to Ohioans ages 80 years and older beginning Tuesday, Jan. 19. About 800 providers across the state have been selected to be part of the first week of distribution.

At a coronavirus briefing, Gov. Mike DeWine said the state has asked local health departments and emergency management agencies to hold press conferences Wednesday and Thursday with information on locations where residents ages 80 and older can get vaccinated.

Updated 2:20 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is making several big changes to its COVID-19 vaccine distribution strategy, officials announced Tuesday, in a bid to jump-start the rollout and get more Americans vaccinated quickly.

The first change is to call on states to expand immediately the pool of people eligible to receive vaccines to those 65 and older, and those with underlying health conditions that make them more susceptible to COVID-19.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

At least three Democratic members of Congress have tested positive for the coronavirus this week, blaming their results on their Republican colleagues' refusal to wear face masks during the hours-long lockdown last Wednesday as pro-Trump extremists attacked the U.S. Capitol.

An Ohio State University researcher is looking into ways news media can address the spread of misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine, with a boost from a $450,000 grant as part of Google’s work to create resources for covering the pandemic.

The general public has better access to health information and is more informed overall than during previous pandemics and major disease outbreaks, OSU Political Science Assistant Professor Thomas Wood said. But that hasn’t stopped the spread of misinformation.

State and local health officials are working on a plan to distribute the COVID-19 vaccine to millions of newly eligible people. Exactly how a person can get the vaccine will depend on systems created on the local level.

Cleveland Clinic Akron General Dr. Carl Allamby is working with the Akron Urban League to assure African-Americans that the COVID-19 vaccine is safe.
Cleveland Clinic Akron General

An African American physician in Summit County whose story inspired many is now working to help assure people in the Black community that the COVID-19 vaccine is safe.

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