Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

  • The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.
  • Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.
  • The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

WOSU's Curious Cbus project wants to hear from Ohioans: What questions do you still have about COVID-19? What aspects of Ohio's response are you curious about?

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WOSU’s Letters from Home is collecting stories from our day-to-day lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to hear reflections and thoughts from all Ohioans.

Power Of Epidemics To Change History

Jul 30, 2020
In this 1918 photo made available by the Library of Congress, volunteer nurses from the American Red Cross tend to influenza patients in the Oakland Municipal Auditorium, used as a temporary hospital.
Edward A. "Doc" Rogers / Library of Congress via AP

This episode originally aired on May 19, 2020.

From the plague to the present day coronavirus pandemic, disease outbreaks have shaped everything in society from politics to personal relationships.

Yale medical historian Frank Snowden explores this theme in his recent book, Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present.

A pharmacist holds a bottle of the drug hydroxychloroquine in Oakland, California
Ben Margot / AP

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy has reversed course on banning the use of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19, after pushback from Gov. Mike DeWine.

There is a connection between lower COVID-19 cases and fewer deaths and closed schools, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Katherine Auger of Cincinnati Children's Hospital says states that closed schools early in the pandemic saw fewer new cases and fewer deaths than states that closed later.

Updated at 9:32 a.m. ET

The coronavirus pandemic triggered the sharpest economic contraction in modern American history, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

An NPR investigation has found irregularities in the process by which the Trump administration awarded a multi-million dollar contract to a Pittsburgh company to collect key data about COVID-19 from the country's hospitals.

The contract is at the center of a controversy over the administration's decision to move that data reporting function from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — which has tracked infection information for a range of illnesses for years — to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Updated at 6:13 p.m. ET

The United States crossed a grim milestone Wednesday, with more than 150,000 lives now lost as a result of the coronavirus.

The tragic number includes around 33,000 people who have died in New York, nearly 16,000 in New Jersey and more than 8,700 in California.

Empty Basketball Courts at Dominion Middle School.
Mary Rathke / WOSU Public Media

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we continue listening to Ohioans sharing their feelings about the upcoming school year, and the plans for reopening schools.

On January 30, the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus — then unnamed — to be a "Public Health Emergency of International Concern." The virus, first reported in China in late 2019, had started to spread beyond its borders, causing 98 cases in 18 countries in addition to some

Understanding COVID-19 Statistics

Jul 29, 2020
A medical professional performs the COVID-19 test at a drive up testing site in Merrillville, Indiana.
Justin Hicks / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The plethora of statistics used to quantify the coronavirus pandemic can overwhelm anyone. Experts track cases, hospitalizations, deaths, positivity rates and R-naughts, but it is hard figure out which ones give us the best idea of how we’re doing fighting the virus.

At the same time, many experts say that we are undercounting the number of cases and number of deaths, removing what little certainty existed.

Licking Heights High School freshmen take notes in a World History class taught by Amy Obhof..
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The state’s largest teachers’ union says schools in areas where coronavirus poses a threat should plan to start online this fall.

Daycare
Magda Ehlers / Pexels

Gov. Mike DeWine announced on Tuesday that starting August 9, child care centers can begin operating under the regular class sizes and ratios from before the pandemic began.

The Honda Marysville Auto Plant is shown, Wednesday, March 18, 2020, in Marysville, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Assembly line workers at the Honda manufacturing plant in Marysville have some new colleagues: office workers. COVID-related staffing shortages at the plant have caused the company to require some of its white-collar employees to work on the line. 

Ohio schools, which were initially closed until May 1, will remain shuttered through the end of the school year.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Columbus City Schools will keep all its students at home learning remotely when the school year begins September 8.

The Midwest could be the next area to see a big surge in coronavirus cases, the top U.S. infectious disease specialist warned Tuesday. But there's still time to stop the upswing, he said, if states follow the national guidelines on reopening safely.

While the Southern United States has been seeing the fastest rise in cases, that now appears to be on the downswing, Fauci told George Stephanopoulos on ABC's Good Morning America.

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