coronavirus testing

This spring, as it became clear COVID-19 was hitting African-Americans especially hard, Indianapolis-area health officials vowed to set up testing sites in “hotspot” neighborhoods. One opened in predominantly Black Arlington Woods, at a respected local institution: Eastern Star Church.

Fresh off a Caribbean cruise in early March, John Campbell developed a cough and fever of 104 degrees. He went to his primary care physician and got a flu test, which came up negative.

Then things got strange. Campbell says the doctor then turned to him and said, "I've called the ER next door, and you need to go there. This is a matter of public health. They're expecting you."

It was March 3, and no one had an inkling yet of just how bad the COVID-19 pandemic would become in the United States.

A caregiver tests a patient for coronavirus at University Hospitals, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Older adults are generally thought to be more likely to die from COVID-19, younger Americans seem to be spreading it more.

Gov. Mike DeWine said last week 60% of Ohio’s new coronavirus cases are in people ages 20-49 and urged younger people to take prevention measures seriously.

Gov. Mike DeWine at his daily coronavirus press conference on Sunday, March 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine announced that Ohio's nursing homes will be allowed to have outdoor visitors again, beginning July 20. It will be the first time in four months that many long-term care residents will be able to see family members in person.

A caregiver tests a patient for coronavirus at University Hospitals, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Hundreds of people lined up in West Akron for free, in-car coronavirus testing over the weekend.

Mike Kapeluck, left to right, Michael Cole, and Ashley Healy have lunch outside of the The Corner Alley during the coronavirus pandemic, Friday, May 15, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / AP

For two consecutive days in a row, Ohio saw the largest spikes in confirmed coronavirus cases since April, with 892 newly reported cases Thursday and 987 cases Friday.

The Trump administration is defending plans to close 13 federally run coronavirus testing sites in five states at the end of the month.

The testing sites are located in Colorado, Pennsylvania, Illinois, New Jersey and Texas. They are the last of 41 federally operated testing sites.

Federal officials say the sites have been closing or transferring to state or local control because it's more efficient to run testing that way. In other instances they argue there are readily available testing sites nearby.

Eighteen Northeast Ohio church congregations are joining forces to offer free, on-site COVID-19 testing.

In addition to getting more people tested, the effort also aims to address racial disparities in coronavirus response.

Greater Cleveland Congregations is launching the Color of Health Initiative, with an emphasis on the African American community and other higher-risk groups. The initiative is a partnership with the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and MetroHealth.

Gov. Mike DeWine gets a coronavirus test during his briefing on June 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine says it is imperative for the state to ward off a spike of COVID-19 cases as the economy begins to reopen. He says one way of accomplishing that is to increase coronavirus testing.

Updated at 2:50 p.m. ET

At a hearing Tuesday on Capitol Hill, Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health and other federal officials said that no one had told them — including President Trump — to slow down testing for the coronavirus. The statements came after Trump has repeatedly said that more testing would lead to more infections being revealed.

In the wake of the massive turnout at anti-racism demonstrations around the country, public health officials are encouraging protesters to get tested for the coronavirus. As purely precautionary testing has become more common, some insurance companies are arguing they can't just pay for everyone who's concerned about their risk to get tested.

Ohio is now allowing nasal swab testing for anyone who might have COVID-19, not just those with severe symptoms.

Some labs are also offering a blood test for people who think they might have had a mild case of the disease.

This antibody test measures the body’s immune response to the coronavirus.

But the head of Cleveland Clinic’s coronavirus testing lab says these antibody tests are largely useless.

The National Guard stands guard outside the Justice Center, Monday, June 1, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / AP

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating a member of the Ohio National Guard, says Gov. Mike DeWine, over allegations they expressed "white supremacist ideology" online before deploying to assist with protest security in Washington, D.C.

Twice now, on March 13 and again on April 27, President Trump gathered some of the country's top corporate executives — from test producers to lab processors to major retailers — to tout his plan to make COVID-19 testing widely available. His vision: Blanket the country in drive-through testing sites.

In this March 24, 2020, file photo, members of The Ohio National Guard assist in repackaging emergency food boxes for food distribution at the Cleveland Food Bank in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio National Guard members have been performing a variety of duties during the COVID19 pandemic. But the roles of members are changing a bit as time progresses.

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