Coronavirus

Credit Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Find WOSU's latest coverage on the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, below.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus. Here are the latest numbers on the outbreak in the United States.

  • The Ohio Department of Health is providing daily updates of the number of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases in Ohio. Find those numbers here.
  • Ohio's coronavirus call center is open to answer questions from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The hotline number is 1-833-4-ASK-ODH or 1-833-427-5634. More information is available at coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • Has your job been impacted by the coronavirus? You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Visit unemployment.ohio.gov to learn more and apply.
  • The city of Columbus The City has compiled a list of resources for human services, businesses, volunteer opportunities and online recreation options.

WOSU's Curious Cbus project wants to hear from Ohioans: What questions do you still have about COVID-19? What aspects of Ohio's response are you curious about?

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Students in the classroom
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said the state fully intends for schools to reopen in the fall.

COVID-19 testing machine
Ohio Department of Health

The state is continuing to build up its contact tracing infrastructure through a partnership with local health departments as health officials tout the importance of matching contact tracing with testing to fight the coronavirus.

The manufacturing industry has suffered during the economic shutdown caused by the pandemic. A new report from the Institute for Supply Management expects the industry won’t return to pre-recession levels until 2022.

As local health departments try to contain the spread of coronavirus by tracking down those who might have been exposed to people with COVID-19, the Ohio House passed a bill requiring health officials to get written permission from people before beginning the contact tracing process.

Adora Namigadde / WOSU

After a more than two-month pause, eviction proceedings resume in Franklin County on Monday, leading some housing advocates to worry about a potential wave of people looking for new housing during the ongoing pandemic.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Jun 1, 2020
Crowds protesting the killing of George Floyd in downtown Columbus on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine called out the National Guard Saturday after peaceful protests in downtown Columbus turned violent over the weekend.

A 10 p.m. curfew is in effect until further notice, and business owners began cleaning up broken windows and damage.

Twice now, on March 13 and again on April 27, President Trump gathered some of the country's top corporate executives — from test producers to lab processors to major retailers — to tout his plan to make COVID-19 testing widely available. His vision: Blanket the country in drive-through testing sites.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, center, tours decontamination units at a COVID-19 testing site with Sean Harrington, of Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System, right, on Wednesday, May 6, 2020, in Miami Gardens.
Lynne Sladky / Associated Press

In late March, workers at a Columbus warehouse were loading Battelle’s Critical Care Decontamination Systems onto truck beds. The technology is the first of its kind – modular so they could be easily shipped to coronavirus hot spots, with the promise of being able to clean 80,000 pieces of personal protective equipment for re-use up to 20 times.

WOSU's project Letters From Home is sharing stories from isolation—how Ohioans are getting through this pandemic, alone and together. While the coronavirus has undoubtedly impacted the physical health of the nation, it's taking a toll on mental health as well.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he expects Senate Republicans will begin considering proposals for a "fourth and final" coronavirus response bill to address the needs of the country "in about a month."

McConnell said the bill will be narrowly crafted and will focus in particular on jobs and schools. He said there could be funding for small businesses and health care, but he will not support extending the additional $600 per week in federal unemployment benefits that run out at the end of July.

Coronavirus In Ohio: Families Weigh Risks Of Sending Loved Ones To Nursing Homes

May 29, 2020
A sign at the Mill Run nursing home in Hilliard.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

In early March, just as Ohioans were learning about the first cases of novel coronavirus in the state, Anna Bondar’s grandfather fell at his Cleveland home. Luckily, the 92-year old, who lives with dementia, wasn’t injured badly.

The tight-knit family started to discuss the possibility of a nursing home, though they had serious reservations.

House Speaker Larry Householder
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The leader of the Ohio House of Representatives says he cannot compel members to practice some of the safety measures recommended by Ohio’s Health Department to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Future Of The Postal Service Amid COVID-19

May 29, 2020
U.S. Postal Service Mail Truck
IFCAR / Wikimedia Commons

This episode originally aired on May 13, 2020.

Postal workers continue to handle and deliver more than 150 million pieces of first-class mail a day while the coronavirus lurks and financial and political pressures on the agency mount.

President Trump wants to privatize the postal service while Congress grapples with the best way to provide relief.

Power Of Epidemics To Change History

May 29, 2020
In this 1918 photo made available by the Library of Congress, volunteer nurses from the American Red Cross tend to influenza patients in the Oakland Municipal Auditorium, used as a temporary hospital.
Edward A. "Doc" Rogers / Library of Congress via AP

This episode originally aired on May 19, 2020.

From the plague to the present day coronavirus pandemic, disease outbreaks have shaped everything in society from politics to personal relationships.

Yale medical historian Frank Snowden explores this theme in his recent book, Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present.

Studies have found the rates of mental illness and suicide are higher for farmers. They work long hours, have limited social contact and are at the mercy of factors such as weather. Now the COVID-19 pandemic is creating even greater challenges to their livelihood—and mental health. 

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