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Holiday Cooking

Dec 24, 2019
chicken holiday dish
Pexels

The holidays are all about food, for eating out, for eating in, for sharing the joy of the season, and for gift giving. 

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher Weekend Chefs in the City: holiday food.

Holiday Cooking

Nov 28, 2019

As the holidays approach, it’s time for home cooks to start preparation.

Today on All Sides, we talk with Sam Sifton, the New York Times food editor, what dishes to prepare, preparation, new recipes and more.

 

Guests:

Turkeys frozen solid, ovens filling with smoke, and refrigerators stacked to the brim: For many, Thanksgiving meal prep means a kitchen in chaos. Luckily, several major food companies are throwing cooks across the country a lifeline — or, more specifically, a help line.

Basters and bakers can call a number of different hotlines for their turkey, dessert, and even cranberry needs. Many of these services also offer help through online chats, text messaging, email, and smart speakers such as Amazon Alexa.

Holiday Cooking

Nov 18, 2019
chicken holiday dish
Pexels

As the holidays approach, it’s time for home cooks to start preparation.

Today on All Sides, we talk with Sam Sifton, the New York Times food editor, what dishes to prepare, preparation, new recipes and more.

Guests:

Mitchell Hall And The Growth Of Culinary School

Sep 4, 2019
restaurant kitchen
Unsplash / Pexels

A new culinary arts center has opened at Columbus State Community College in an 80,000-square-foot building that will include a culinary theater, teaching kitchens, and also house a restaurant and bakery cafe.

But Mitchell Hall - named for lead donor and restaurant mogul Cameron Mitchell - is more than just a wanna-be chef’s dream; it reflects a growing interest in the culinary trades as a profession.

Today on All Sides: U.S. culinary schools, the business model and their growing popularity.

Guests:

Did Cooking Really Give Us The F-Word?

Mar 14, 2019

Processed foods get blamed for a lot of things. But this week, a group of linguists took it to a whole new level.

To put it crudely, they argue that the invention of processed foods like yogurt and gruel thousands of years ago gave us the F-word. Lots of F-words. To be more precise, the researchers think that softer foods led to more frequent use of the sounds "f" and "v" in human languages. (Other experts on language are skeptical; more about that later.)

According to the new theory, food influenced language through a complex chain of events.

Kay Davenport opened her cookware shop in October 1998. She tried to sell the shop but wasn't able to secure a buyer.
Steve Brown / WOSU

Kay Davenport just knew it was time to go. After more than 20 years of running her North Market Cookware shop, she wanted to retire and travel the world.

What she didn’t know was the uncertain future of the iconic Columbus market would make it impossible to find a buyer for her business.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Walking through Creekside Park, tucked between downtown Gahanna and Big Walnut Creek, I just see a bunch of trees – at first.

America’s Test Kitchen

Sep 26, 2018
Guy MOLL / Flickr

America’s Test Kitchen is a popular public television cooking show that has been teaching Americans new recipes for years.  Now, it is targeting foodies and at-home cooks with its new illustrated cookbook.

The no-frills Dinner Illustrated: 175 Meals Ready in 1 Hour Or Less gives readers a different experience, focusing on the quality of recipes.

Get your own copy Americas Test Kitchen Dinner Illustrated Cookbook with a gift of $120 or more.

An imagined conversation between two yeast cells appears in Kurt Vonnegut's 1973 novel Breakfast of Champions. "They were discussing the possible purposes of life," Vonnegut writes. If that's not absurd enough, their existential discussion takes place against a weird, dismal backdrop, "as they ate sugar and suffocated in their own excrement." Little did they know, their little yeasty lives had an important, human-centric purpose.

Stop Crying! Tear-Free Onions Are Here

Feb 8, 2018

Using onions to explain away crying is a familiar gag. On The Brady Bunch, housekeeper Alice answers the phone and cries as the caller tells her a sad story. After hanging up she says, "Darn onions," holding up the offending allium. And Rowlf the Dog sang on The Muppet Show, "I never harmed an onion. So why should they make me cry?"

Salt and pepper shakers are so omnipresent on tabletops that adding a dash of the white or black stuff (or both!) is almost a dining rite. The seasonings pair well with just about everything and they go together like — well, salt and pepper.

Shirline Burbanks is one of the 6.5 million Americans suffering from congestive heart failure (CHF). Recently, she checked herself in to the Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, complaining of shortness of breath. But unlike most other CHF patients in the U.S., within hours of her admittance, Burbanks was met at her bedside with an offer: to sign up for cooking classes.

Allie Hill got really serious about eating local food about eight years ago. She was cooking for three young children. "I was able to go to the farmers' market and find my produce — fruits and veggies," she says. "I was able to find meat, and even some dairy."

She simply couldn't find local version of other foods, though. These are foods that fill her pantry, like marinara sauce, apple sauce and everything else that comes to us preserved in sealed jars and cans.

Behold, the cocktail avocado. No, that's not a weird cucumber. It's the latest in avocado innovation, on offer at British retail chain Marks & Spencer.

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