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Congress

Note: NPR will be updating these numbers as more results come in.

Updated at 10:44 a.m. ET Thursday

After Tuesday's elections, a record number of women will serve in Congress come January 2019.

With results still coming in, 98 women have won their House races as of early Wednesday morning, up from the current 84. In addition, at least 13 women won Senate seats. That's in addition to the 10 female senators who were not up for re-election this year.

Updated at 3:44 a.m. ET Wednesday

Republicans and Democrats will split control of Congress next year. House Democrats are projected to pick up enough GOP-held seats to take the majority in the House, according to The Associated Press. Senate Republicans are projected to maintain and perhaps expand their majority.

The results create a divided Capitol Hill next year and mean President Trump's plans for new tax cuts, tougher immigration legislation and changes to the Affordable Care Act will be blocked.

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Sen. Sherrod Brown has been declared the winner in Ohio's U.S. Senate race, defeating Republican challenger Rep. Jim Renacci.

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Republicans will hold onto all of Ohio's statewide offices, although Democrats will maintain control of one U.S. Senate seat.

Liveblog: Election Day 2018

Nov 6, 2018
NPR

WOSU is bringing you comprehensive coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, both in Ohio and around the country.

Keeping control of the House would validate President Trump's governing style and mean full speed ahead for Hill Republicans to move his agenda. But if the GOP loses its majority it will need to to go on defense to protect Trump.

When the Democrats lost the House in 2010, they rapidly saw President Barack Obama's legislative agenda die.

Veteran Democratic strategist Paul Begala doesn't think it's hyperbolic to say that "everything" is at stake for Democrats heading into Tuesday's elections.

"They always say it's the most important election of your life," he says, explaining that in the past two years, Democrats learned the consequences of being "completely shut out" as the GOP controlled both Congress and the White House.

If Democrats fail to take back the House and make significant gains at the state level, they'll be shut out again, without a say in legislation and judicial appointments.

Danny O'Connor / Twitter

In west Dayton, Democratic congressional contender Theresa Gasper spent a recent Saturday afternoon shaking hands and chatting in a string of black-owned barber shops and salons.

NPR

We’ve reached the midterms, and voters in every state in the country will be going to the polls on Tuesday. This election will have far-reaching consequences by determining who controls Congress, state governments, and more.

Nearly all the charges of about $30,000 in illegal campaign spending by Aftab Pureval's congressional campaign were dismissed today by the Ohio Elections Commission.

Only six days before the election, Democratic congressional candidate Aftab Pureval has fired his campaign manager and long-time friend, Sarah Topy, along with other unnamed staff members based on "new information."

Anthony Gonzalez and Susan Moran Palmer
WOSU

No matter how the vote goes next Tuesday, there will be a new face in Washington from Ohio’s 16th Congressional District. Incumbent Jim Renacci decided to run for U.S. Senate instead of seeking re-election, and both major party nominees to replace him are political newcomers: Democrat Susan Moran Palmer and Republican Anthony Gonzalez.

Democrat Ken Harbaugh (left) and Republican Bob Gibbs at their only debate one week before election day.
M.L. Schultze / ideastream

At the only debate in Ohio’s 7th Congressional District race, the candidates collided on the expected issues including healthcare, tax cuts and national security, but the killing of 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh last week came up as well.

Democrat Danny O'Connor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Bundled in wool coat and scarf, Danny O’Connor stands outside the entrance to a Pataskala High School football field. It’s senior night, and the announcer introduces each soon-to-be graduate over the PA system.

With the nation reeling from an epidemic of drug overdose deaths, President Trump signed legislation Wednesday that is aimed at helping people overcome addiction and preventing addictions before they start.

"Together we are going to end the scourge of drug addiction in America," Trump said at a White House event celebrating the signing. "We are going to end it or we are going to at least make an extremely big dent in this terrible, terrible problem."

The opioid legislation was a rarity for this Congress, getting overwhelming bipartisan support in both chambers.

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