comics

Caitlin McGurk, curator at the Billy Ireland museum, helped organize the "Ladies First" exhibit on women cartoonists.
Clare Roth / WOSU

The 19th Amendment was ratified 100 years ago, granting women the right to vote in the U.S. Along with marches, op-eds and organizing, the women who fought for suffrage had another tool in their belt: a pen.

Now those works are on display at Ohio State's Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum as part of a new exhibit on women in comics.

James Thurber’s Influence on Modern Cartoons

Oct 2, 2019

"It’s not the ink—it’s the think that makes a cartoon,” wrote longtime cartoon editor for “The New Yorker” magazine, Robert Mankoff.

That’s fitting with James Thurber’s style and what he brought to cartooning in the 20th century, according to scholar Michael Rosen.

Ohio State professor Frederick Aldama, co-creator and director of SOL-CON.
Debbie Holmes / WOSU

The growing racial diversity of Columbus inspired an Ohio State University English professor to create an exposition for black and brown comic artists and animators. Now in its fifth year, “SÕL-CON: The Brown and Black Comix Expo” brings together students, indie comics, exhibitors and industry insiders.

A Marvel Of A Man: Stan Lee Dead At 95

Nov 12, 2018

American comic book writer, editor, publisher and former President of Marvel Comics Stan Lee died Monday at the age of 95.

Lee gave us over six decades of work like The Incredible Hulk and The Amazing Spider-Man — superheroes we could identify with, characters that allowed us to suspend our disbelief because they reacted to bizarre situations like you or I might.

Fifty years ago, Charlie Brown lost his beach ball.

It was found and returned to him by a boy named Franklin, and the two proceeded to build a sandcastle together.

The simple encounter of two boys on a beach was how cartoonist Charles Schulz introduced the first black character in his widely read comic strip, Peanuts. It was July 31, 1968 — just months after Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination — and the newest member of the Peanuts gang was a big deal.

Walk into a comics shop this Saturday, May 5th, and you'll get some free comic books.

Free Comic Book Day has been an annual event for 17 years now. I've been writing up this guide to the FCBD books for the past 10 of those, so believe me when I say:

This year's a good 'un. The best yet. Don't skip it.

There are more all-ages books in this year's mix, more stories starring girls, women and people of color and a healthier, more robust selection of genres to choose from than ever before.

Mort Walker, the renowned comic strip artist best known for his cartoon depicting the high jinks of the loafing Army private "Beetle Bailey," died Saturday at the age of 94 at his home in Stamford, Conn.

Walker drew Beetle Bailey as a daily comic strip for 68 years, making him the longest-running artist in the medium's history, according to a statement from King Features, which performed the original syndication for the strip.

The Enduring Appeal of Superheroes

Aug 7, 2017
marvelousRoland / Flickr

Flying. Extreme Speed. Super strength. Abilities like these make superheroes superhuman. Thanks to advancements in special effects, superheroes are more appealing than ever and comics are garnering more attention due to it. Films and comics are working to expand and diversify their audience, but ultimately what draws us to superheroes may not be superhuman at all.

Today we're talking about the enduring appeal of superheroes, why we love them and how companies are working to expand their popularity with different strategies, including diversity. 

As you may have heard (AND I DEARLY HOPE YOU FRIGGIN' HAVE), our Summer Readers' Poll on Comics and Graphic Novels came out yesterday. You cast thousands of votes, and a crazily accomplished judging panel (which, due to some egregious error in the vetting process, also included me) combed over the top vote-getters, spent hours on the phone arguing for or against each one ...

This year, Free Comic Book Day turns sixteen years old.

The good news: It can drive itself to swim practice now!

The bad news: When you ask it to drive its younger siblings Record Store Day and Independent Bookstore Day to Gymboree it'll give you THAT LOOK IT GETS and spend the rest of the day sulking.

Here's the gist: Walk into a comic shop this Saturday, May 6, and you'll get some free comic books.

James Thurber's Life in Columbus

May 4, 2017
Columbusite / Wikimedia Commons

James Thurber, a famous cartoonist and humorist, recreated the city of Columbus through his stories that toggled between his own reality and his pure imagination. Bob Hunter, a former sports columnist for The Dispatch, set aside the world of sports to enter in Thurber's Columbus with his new book, Thurberville.

Thurberville revisits the Columbus that Thurber shared with the world and draws a line between the fact and the fiction of James Thurber's life. Join us today in uncovering the life of James Thurber.

Clare Roth

In  May 1977, Lucy Shelton Caswell began to gather and curate the art of Columbus cartoonist Milton Caniff. That collection became The Ohio State University's Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum, which is celebrating four decades of preserving and showcasing the world of cartoons and comics - now a much different world than when it began.

Stu and Tara Rase

After battling poverty as a child with her family, Tara Rase got out of Columbus. Now, in a series called "Refugee Road," she's revisiting that journey panel by panel.

It's a Wednesday at Fantom Comics in Washington, D.C., and the store is bustling.

Every Wednesday is New Comics Day — when subscribers come in to pick up the week's new titles, check in with each other, and talk comics. This Wednesday is no different.

Well. It's a little different.

I'm used to comics-shop chatter that revolves around things like which new books are worth checking out, what storylines have gone one way too long, and which hero could kick which other hero's butt.