colleges

Gov. Mike DeWine gives a coronavirus update from his home on August 20, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine says the state is already seeing an increase of of COVID-19 cases as schools and colleges bring students back to campus.

As the fall semester gets underway, college students are reuniting with their friends, getting (re)acquainted with campus and doing what college students often do: partying. But in the time of the coronavirus, as more parties surface university administrators have been quick to condemn — and even berate — the behavior of students.

"Be better. Be adults. Think of someone other than yourself," pleaded a letter to students at Syracuse University following a large gathering on campus.

Central State University is launching a technology education program and will serve as a regional hub for historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) across the Midwest.

Updated at 6:34 p.m. ET

In a swift reversal, the Trump administration has agreed to rescind a directive that would have barred international college students from the U.S. if their colleges offered classes entirely online in the fall semester.

A group of University of Dayton professors have joined a growing number of educators nationwide who are concerned about re-opening plans for the fall. They plan a Tuesday news conference to ask for an administration response on the items that most importantly deal with health and safety.

Just two days after federal officials barred international students from attending U.S. colleges that go online-only this fall, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have made their objections clear. They sued the U.S. government in federal court Wednesday, seeking to have the U.S. Immigration Customs And Enforcement policy reversed and declared unlawful.

Foreign students attending U.S. colleges that will operate entirely online this fall semester cannot remain in the country to do so, according to new regulations released Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Professors’ unions at Wright State and Miami University are warning of problems to come when students return to campus this fall. 

More than a dozen chapters of the American Association of University Professors have signed an open letter to college administrators, warning of a potential “superspreader event” as campuses reopen.

Young People And Coronavirus

Mar 23, 2020
 Visitors enjoy Clearwater Beach, Wednesday, March 18, 2020, in Clearwater Beach, Fla. Beach goers are keeping a safe distance from each other to help protect from the spread of the Coronavirus.
Chris O'Meara / AP

Hundreds of thousands of college students are being told to leave their dorms amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

This means moving back in with Mom and Dad, being isolated from their friends and losing the freedom they’ve grown used to.

Some young people who are unhappy with government recommendations of social distancing are ignoring them and gathering in large groups as they did before.

Skilled Trade Jobs

Jul 16, 2018
construction worker
U.S. Air Force

The number of construction and extraction jobs are expected to grow 11 percent between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, a wave of baby boomers working skilled trade jobs such as these are retiring, and there are not enough young workers being trained to replace them.

Skilled Trade Jobs

Jul 5, 2018
U.S. Air Force

The number of construction and extraction jobs are expected to grow 11 percent between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, a wave of baby boomers working skilled trade jobs such as these are retiring, and there are not enough young workers being trained to replace them.

Skilled Trade Jobs

Jun 21, 2018
construction worker
U.S. Air Force

The number of construction and extraction jobs are expected to grow 11 percent between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, a wave of baby boomers working skilled trade jobs such as these are retiring, and there are not enough young workers being trained to replace them.

Once again, it was another big week for national education news. Here's our quick take on the top stories.

Senate scraps federal regulations

On Thursday, the Senate voted to roll back Obama-era rules that clarified and elaborated on a wide range of accountability requirements in the federal education law known as The Every Student Succeeds Act.

One third of students attending college in Ohio might soon find themselves scrambling to replace grants they've been receiving from the state. That's the message from an organization that represents private and independent colleges throughout Ohio. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.