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power lines near Canel Winchester, Ohio
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio legislators have passed new energy laws that affects everyone’s electric bills and change the state’s course on green energy policies. But it can be easy to get bogged down by all the information contained in the bill, here's a breakdown.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur speaks in Washington, D.C. on July 18, 2018, on the anniversary of the Seneca Falls convention.
Marcy Kaptur / Twitter

Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), who chairs a U.S. House energy and water subcommittee, says that Ohio’s new energy bill is a step in the wrong direction.

Updated at 3:11 p.m. ET

President Trump has thrown his latest lifeline to the ailing coal industry, significantly weakening one of former President Barack Obama's key policies to address climate change.

The Environmental Protection Agency released the final version of its Affordable Clean Energy rule on Wednesday. It's supported by the coal industry, but it is not clear that it will be enough to stop more coal-fired power plants from closing.

In another proposed reversal of an Obama-era standard, the Environmental Protection Agency Friday said limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants is not cost-effective and should not be considered "appropriate and necessary."

The EPA says it is keeping the 2012 restrictions in place for now, in large part because utilities have already spent billions to comply with them. But environmental groups worry the move is a step toward repealing the limits and could make it harder to impose other regulations in the future.

The Trump administration plans to eliminate an Obama-era requirement that new coal-fired power plants have expensive technology to capture carbon dioxide emissions.

FirstEnergy Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / AP

Consumer, business and environmental groups are rallying to oppose FirstEnergy’s request for a federal bailout now that the company’s subsidiary FirstEnergy Solutions has filed for bankruptcy.

This could be the major utility company’s last shot at keeping its nuclear and coal plants open.

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

FirstEnergy, one of Ohio’s largest utilities, is moving forward with a plan to shut down its coal and nuclear power plants after filing for bankruptcy. But FirstEnergy's workers aren't taking the move lying down.

Brian Bull / ideastream

It was one of Donald Trump’s biggest campaign rally cries when he was running for president – ending what he called the “war on coal.”

FirstEnergy

The Ohio EPA is welcoming word that U.S. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt wants to repeal the national power plant emissions regulations written during the Obama Administration.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt is vowing to speed the cleanup of toxic Superfund sites, part of a shift away from climate change and toward what he calls the "basics" of clean air and water. The EPA's Superfund program manages the cleanup of some of the most toxic waste sites. Pruitt says the EPA will soon name a top 10 list of sites to focus on.

One potential site for that list is the Tar Creek Superfund site in far northeast Oklahoma, where a team of agency officials recently visited.

Coal plants are struggling to make a profit in Ohio. And there have been proposals from regulators and lawmakers that would help prop up those plants by passing additional costs on to customers. However, legislators say their latest plan would help a struggling plant that was created under unusual circumstances that go back 60 years. 

State energy regulators are looking over a new plan, proposed by AEP, that would allow the utility company to increase rates on customer electric bills.