civilian review board

Mayor Andrew Ginther announces the selection of Tom Quinlan as the new Chief of Columbus Police, on Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

The city of Columbus has accepted the recommendations of a working grouped tasked with structuring the voter-approved Civilian Review Board, which will be tasked with providing independent oversight of the Columbus Division of Police.

Protesters at the Ohio Statehouse demand justice for Casey Goodson Jr. on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

This past weekend’s protests over the fatal shooting of Casey Goodson Jr. by a Franklin County Sheriff’s deputy comes at a critical junction for reforms to local policing.

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus residents voted overwhelmingly last week to add more oversight of police. Issue 2, which passed with about 74% of the vote, creates a new Civilian Review Board and an inspector general for the Columbus Division of Police. 

Voters this week had their say on what police reform would look like, approving dozens of measures that will begin shaping policies at departments across the country.

Retired judge Gary Tyack was elected as Franklin County Prosecutor, ousting longtime Republican Ron O'Brien.
Gary Tyack

Newly elected Franklin County Prosecutor Gary Tyack says the first item on his agenda is diversifying the staff within prosecutor's office.

Lion statue in front of Columbus Division of Police Central Headquarters.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus residents strongly approved the creation of a Civilian Review Board to carry out independent investigations of police misconduct, as well as the appointment of an inspector general for the Columbus Division of Police. With 100% of precincts reporting on election night, a clear majority voted in favor of the issue.

Columbus Police vehicles outside the division headquarters.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus voters will decide on Nov. 3 whether to amend the city’s charter to enable a civilian review board.

It is the only large metropolitan area in the country without one. But not all civilian review boards are the same.

A Columbus Police officer aims a pepper spray cannister at a protester's face on May 30, 2020.
Katie Forbes / Kforbesphotography

The killing of Minneapolis man George Floyd in May sparked protests across the nation. Since his death, there’s been a stream of Columbus demonstrations demanding police reform. 

A Reynoldsburg Police cruiser
Reynoldsburg Police / Facebook

As Columbus leaders turn to voters to approve police oversight measures, Reynoldsburg city officials and the local police union have reached an agreement in principle for a new Civilian Review Board. 

Protesters on the sidewalk of the Ohio Statehouse face Columbus Police officers, who stood in the middle of High Street, on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Two months after massive protests took over downtown Columbus, City Council has signed off on asking voters if they want independent police oversight.

Columbus Police vehicles outside the division headquarters.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus voters will have a chance to weigh in on police oversight in November. City leaders on Monday announced a charter amendment that would create a Civilian Review Board, a major goal of police reformers.

Quentin Smith was found guilty of aggravated murder in the death of Westerville Police officers Eric Joering and Anthony Morelli.
Fred Squillante / Pool/Columbus Dispatch

The Columbus police union on Thursday demanded the immediate removal of an attorney from the recently-formed Civilian Review Board working group, while responding to critical comments made by Mayor Andrew Ginther.

Protesters on the sidewalk of the Ohio Statehouse face Columbus Police officers, who stood in the middle of High Street, on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Mayor Andrew Ginther on Wednesday said the city is referring 56 Columbus Police incidents to third parties for possible administrative or criminal charges.

Lion statue in front of Columbus Division of Police Central Headquarters.
David Holm / WOSU

The killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis Police officer sparked protests across the world and calls for change in police practices. Some activists are calling for severe measures such as defunding or abolishing police departments, while lawmakers are seeking more incremental reforms.