Cincinnati police

Cincinnati police are looking into who vandalized the Black Lives Matter mural on Eighth and Ninth streets outside of City Hall. Police say someone poured red paint on the mural early Sunday morning. 

Cincinnati's Law and Public Safety Committee voted on a series of proposals Tuesday to reform the police department by holding it accountable and making it more transparent. The full council could pass the measures in the next month.

The Urban League of Greater Southwestern Ohio will use a million dollar grant to monitor police reforms and investigate claims of police misconduct outside of Cincinnati's city limits. The money will establish the Center for Social Justice at the Urban League, with work expected to launch in mid- to late July.

People arrested by Cincinnati Police for violating the city's recent curfew will not have the charges against them dismissed. But they could soon have options to avoid prosecution.

The daily demonstrations honoring George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis May 25, continued Friday outside the Hamilton County Courthouse. About 40 to 50 people were there, which is smaller than much of the week.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley on Wednesday pushed back the city's curfew from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., which will be in effect starting now through Monday, June 8, at 6 a.m.

A fifth day of protests calling for police reforms continued Tuesday in Cincinnati. A mid-day gathering outside the Hamilton County Courthouse was smaller than previous events. People stood peacefully holding signs and listening as crowd members took turns speaking.

Protesters took to the streets of Downtown Cincinnati for a third time on Sunday, all in honor of George Floyd, the African American Minneapolis man killed by a white police officer last week.

Cincinnati is extending a weekend curfew implemented as protests continue with more planned Sunday and Monday. A citywide curfew will now begin at 9 p.m., running through at least Tuesday morning.

The Cincinnati Police Department is in the middle of a major technology upgrade. That includes new body cameras, updated Tasers and replacing in-car video recording systems.

Jeremiah Miller, a biracial man, found different experiences with police when they listed his race as "black" compared to when they listed him as "white."
Albert Cesare / Cincinnati Enquirer

Followed in a public park and forced to leave. Cuffed and questioned for whistling while waiting for a bus. Pulled over for spending too much time at a gas station.

Some black drivers and pedestrians in Cincinnati say they’ve been unfairly stopped and questioned by police. 

A Ride or Die gun trainer instructs a student on how to safely use her gun.
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

For some, after Donald Trump was elected president, conversations about race became even more intense.

Tensions heightened so much, one 15-year-old African American boy cried and began to question the safety of his Ohio family. Single mother Tiffany Ware reassured her son she would make sure they were safe.

A group of Cincinnati teens, sponsored by the Children's Law Center, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation and the Urban League, is making recommendations to the city of Cincinnati to reduce the number of youth arrests and eliminate racial disparities.

The First District Court of Appeals is considering whether to lift an injunction that prohibits the Cincinnati Citizen Complaint Authority from questioning any Cincinnati police officer who is a witness during an ongoing criminal case. A court hearing was held Tuesday.

This week marks the one-year memorial of the shooting at the Fifth Third Center in downtown Cincinnati.

After the events on Sept. 6, 2018, #CincyStrong became a trending topic locally and a rallying force for the city to get behind. Though Cincinnati has not experienced a mass shooting since (defined by the FBI as four or more murdered during an event), gun violence continues in the city. In urban communities like the West End, the conversation around it continues.

Pages