chronic pain

Chronic pain patients speak out against new rules for prescribing opioids Chronic pain patients at Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. 

FPS Groningen / Flickr

Bob Jones of Trumbull County has recurring pain from an old injury, but he isn’t going to be getting opioids. He never wanted them anyway, and found his own solution for pain relief. 

Thomas Bradley / WOSU News

With the opioid crisis killing an estimated 11 Ohioans a day, Gov. John Kasich announced new rules for monitoring the prescribing of painkillers to patients suffering chronic pain.

North Ridgeville resident Adrian Frederick said he’s had horrible leg pain for years, caused by a surgery he had involving cancer. The pain is constant, and gets worse at night.

“I’m just willing to try anything at this point,” Frederick said. “I’m just sick of being in pain all the time.”

Chances are, you — or someone you know — has suffered from lower back pain.

It can be debilitating. It's a leading cause of disability globally.

And the number of people with the often-chronic condition is likely to increase.

It took several months and a team of half a dozen doctors, nurses and therapists to help Kim Brown taper off the opioid painkillers she’d been on for two years.

Brown had been taking the pills since an injury in 2014. It wasn’t until she met Dr. Dennis McManus, a neurologist who specializes in non-pharmacological approaches to pain management that she learned she had some control over her pain.

“That’s when life changed,” she said.


FPS Groningen / Flickr

The Ohio State Chiropractic Association is touting what its members believe to be a clear path Ohioans can take to cut down on opioid addiction. This path would take a culture change when it comes to the reputation of alternative medicine.

A few years ago, Renea Molden's doctors told her they wanted to take her off her opioid pills.

"I was mad, I'll be honest. I was mad. I was frustrated," she says.

Molden, of Kansas City, Mo., is 40 and struggles with chronic pain because of fibromyalgia, bulging disks and degenerative disk disease. Her doctors told her they worried about the possibility of her taking hydrocodone for the rest of her life. She told them those three pills she took every day seemed to be the only way she could make it through work, going shopping or even fixing dinner.

Infant Mortality, Anti-Aging and Chronic Pain Relief

Sep 20, 2017
jakobking85 / Pixabay

For new parents it can be a tricky and tough decision figuring out which methods for sleep are the safest for their infants. Find out more about the dangers of sleeping for babies on today's show. Also can chronic pain be treated without opioids and pain clinics? Get information on drug free alternatives for pain treatment.

Each year, more than 300 patients with chronic pain take part in a three-week program at the Pain Rehabilitation Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Their complaints range widely, from specific problems such as intractable lower-back pain to systemic issues such as fibromyalgia. By the time patients enroll, many have tried just about everything to get their chronic pain under control. Half are taking opioids.

prescription medicine bottles
David Kessler / Flickr Creative Commons

Medical professionals who help people dealing with chronic pain are gathering in Cincinnati this weekend. It will be the first meeting of the Ohio Society of Interventional Pain Physicians.

The opioid epidemic has intensified the call for alternatives to narcotics for people with acute and chronic pain.

In last week’s State of the State, Ohio Governor John Kasich said he wants to put more money toward finding other options. He recommended devoting $20 million to help Ohio researchers develop new technologies to fight pain.

11:00 If you learned CPR five years ago, you'll remember a mouth-to-mouth breathing component. But guidelines continue to change, and CPR's effectiveness remains to be proven. This hour we'll talk about what to do when hearts stop. We'll also learn about the chronic pain epidemic and how to wean ourselves off hidden sugars.

Guests