China

Sherrod Brown
Nick Castele / ideastream

Sen. Sherrod Brown sent a letter to President Trump on Wednesday urging him to stay tough in trade talks with China. That same day, the Senate Banking Committee passed a bill co-sponsored by Brown with a similar goal. 

Updated at 3:18 p.m. ET

China is cutting tariffs on vehicles from the U.S., but the biggest benefits could go to German automakers — and Tesla, the American electric-car maker.

Chinese President Xi Jinping signaled in a speech last month that the tariff cut would be coming. The foreign ministry confirmed it Tuesday: Tariffs will drop from 25 percent to 15 percent for imported cars. Tariffs on imported auto parts will fall to six percent.

Updated at 4:21 p.m. ET

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says he will explore other ways to punish a Chinese cellphone manufacturer, after a surprising tweet from President Trump that said the original penalty was too harsh.

Trump tweeted on Sunday that smartphone giant ZTE was losing "too many jobs in China" as a result of U.S. sanctions. He said he was working with Chinese President Xi Jinping to find a solution.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is meeting with Chinese officials this week to discuss trade tariffs. President Trump announced a tariff on Chinese steel and aluminum and the Chinese responded with tariffs on American products. It’s escalated to at least $50 billion dollars in tariffs for each country. The extra charges on Chinese steel may please Ohio steelworkers but it worries Ohio farmers. 

Tom Trout of Hickory Tree Farm in Medina County walks through his garage by several 8-wheel-drive John Deere tractors and other equipment.

Updated at 1:01 p.m. ET

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and other top U.S. trade officials ended a round of talks in Beijing on Friday, failing to secure large goals that ranged from cutting the trade imbalance by $200 billion by the end of 2020 to stopping China from targeting U.S. technology and intellectual property.

Both sides say the talks will continue with quarterly meetings.

Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Apr 10, 2018
L Alleb Brewer / Flickr

President Trump has condemned the suspected chemical weapons attack that killed several people in Syria, calling it a "barbaric act." He has said that he will make a decision about a potential military response within the next two days. Russia and Syria have denied any responsibility for the attack. 

We'll also look at the Mueller investigation, a potential trade war with China, and more with the Political Junkie, Ken Rudin.

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Ohio hog farmers are reacting to the news that China is planning to attach a tariff on pork exports – a move in response to the U.S. proposed tariff on Chinese steel. Ohio farmers say they’ve seen an immediate effect from the announcement.

Updated at 8:07 a.m. ET Friday

China's government on Friday hit back at President Trump's latest call for more tariffs by saying it was prepared to "follow through to the end and fight back resolutely."

President Trump upped the ante in his trade dispute with China Thursday by signaling his willingness to impose more tariffs than previously announced.

In response to the Trump administration's threats to place tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese goods, China has threatened to sanction $50 billion in U.S. exports, including airplanes, cars and chemicals. These tariffs would also target some of America's most successful exporters — farmers.

As the sun was coming up Wednesday, farmers at Betty's Truck Stop near Sweet Springs, Mo., took their coffee with a serving of bad news.

United Soybean Board / Flickr

After placing a 25 percent tariff on U.S. pork and a 15 percent tariff on other goods like fruit and wine earlier this week, China is now threatening to go further. China is looking to expand its scope to exports essential to Central Ohio’s economy, including soybeans, beef and cars.

Updated at 5:26 p.m. ET

China's leaders followed President Trump in taking another step toward a new trade war, announcing a plan to put steep tariffs on $50 billion of U.S. imports. China's proposed 25 percent tariffs would target a wide range of American products, from soybeans and whiskey to airplanes and cars.

"China currently buys about $14 billion worth of American soybeans each year — almost a third of the entire U.S. crop," NPR's Dan Charles reports for our Newscast unit. "Prices for U.S. soybeans tumbled by 3 to 5 percent" on the news, Dan adds.

Looming Trade War with China

Apr 4, 2018
D. Myles Cullen / Flickr

On Monday, China retaliated against President Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs with a few of their own. The Chinese government put in place a 25 percent tariff on pork products and a 15 percent tariff on agricultural products such as fruit and wine. After the White House announced more tariffs, China responded with proposed tariffs on U.S. imports in 106 categories including soybeans, a multi-billion dollar industry in Ohio.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

China is retaliating against the Trump administration's tariffs on Chinese goods, imposing charges of its own Monday on a list of 128 imports from the United States, including agricultural products ranging from fruit to wine to frozen pork.

China's tariffs add fuel to what many economists fear is a burgeoning trade war between the two economic superpowers.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Ohio’s Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown, has introduced a bill to review foreign investments and their impact on U.S. workers, ahead of today's anticipated announcement of major tariffs from the Trump administration.

It took just about two weeks from the public announcement to Sunday's legislative vote that erased presidential term limits from the constitution, potentially allowing Xi Jinping to rule China indefinitely.

"After it was announced, the move sent tremors through the Communist Party's intelligentsia," observes Zhang Xixian, an expert on party politics at the Central Party School in Beijing. But thanks to heavy government censorship of media and the Internet, there was little visible debate or opposition to the move.

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