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Charlottesville

Avowed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr. was given a second sentence of life in prison for killing a woman and injuring dozens when he rammed his car into a group of people protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017.

On Monday, Charlottesville Circuit Judge Richard Moore sentenced Fields to the life term plus 419 years and $480,000 in fines, in keeping with a jury's recommendation.

Updated at 6:32 p.m. ET

The man who drove his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville, Va., killing one person and injuring 35 has been sentenced to spending the rest of his life in prison.

A federal judge issued the sentence of life without the possibility of parole on Friday for self-proclaimed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr., 22, of the Toledo, Ohio, area.

The Daily Stormer site was taken off various domain registries after the Charlottesville "Unite The Right" rally in 2017.
Screenshot by NPR

A neo-Nazi website operator is not excused from returning to the U.S. for questioning under oath in a lawsuit accusing him of orchestrating an anti-Semitic "troll storm" against a Montana real estate agent's family, a federal judge has ruled.

The 21-year-old avowed neo-Nazi who murdered a woman when he plowed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters last year at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., will likely spend the rest of his life in prison.

A jury in Charlottesville said Tuesday that James Alex Fields Jr. should be sentenced to life plus 419 years in prison and $480,000 in fines, for killing Heather Heyer and seriously injuring 35 others.

Judge Richard Moore will decide whether to sign off on the recommended sentence at a hearing on March 29.

Jury selection begins today in the trial of the man accused of ramming his car through a crowd of people protesting a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. James Alex Fields, Jr. is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Heather Heyer, and faces additional charges of malicious wounding.

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET

A small group of about 25 white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite the Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va.

The demonstrators have since left D.C. via Metro, and WAMU's Elly Yu reports that counterprotesters have headed home, too.

James Alex Fields Jr., 21, pleaded not guilty Thursday to dozens of federal hate crimes in connection with last summer's car attack on people protesting a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

The man who police say intentionally rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., this summer, now faces a first-degree murder charge. A judge upgraded the second-degree murder charge against James Fields Jr. at a preliminary hearing on Thursday.

The 20-year-old Ohio man has been in jail since his arrest on Aug. 12, when police say he accelerated into a group of people, killing Heather Heyer and injuring some three dozen others.

Richard Spencer / Twitter

An associate and organizer of campus tours for white nationalist Richard Spencer has followed through on threats to sue The Ohio State University after school officials refused to rent campus space for Spencer to speak.

YouTube

After his request to speak at The Ohio State University was rejected, white nationalist Richard Spencer made a similar proposal to the University of Cincinnati.

Southern Poverty Law Center

White racial extremism is on the rise in the Miami Valley, according to Dr. Arthur Jipson, a University of Dayton professor who has studied the movement for over 20 years. And, he says, activity is not expected to decrease over the next few years.

Josh Link/Twitter

Violence during recent rallies at the University of California-Berkeley and the University of Virginia helped reignite a nationwide debate over free speech on college campuses, and when school leaders should intervene.

Two conservative Ohio lawmakers are pushing a new bill that they say would ensure all points of view are represented at Ohio’s public universities.

Josh Link/Twitter

About 200 people marched from the Oval to the Ohio State University student union on Sunday as part on event organizers dubbed Columbus United Against Hate.

Democrats have spent the past two weeks condemning President Trump over his initial equivocating response to racist violence in Charlottesville, Va.

The question is, what to do next: keep up broad critiques of Trump's leadership, or focus on narrower goals, like the removal of public monuments honoring Confederate leaders?

Willoughby-Eastlake City Schools

At least four Confederate commemorations have been taken down in Ohio, in response to last week's Charlottesville, Va., clash between white nationalist protesters and anti-racist counter-protestors that left three people dead.

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