Center for Community Solutions

Changes to regulations of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) will soon take away benefits for thousands of Ohioans.

At least 29 counties are losing access to a waiver that makes the benefits more accessible. In those counties alone, about 20,000 people will lose food assistance benefits completely, said Loren Anthes, public policy fellow for the Center for Community Solutions.

A job application with a pen.
Flazingo / Flickr

Advocates are worried about the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, which the state got permission to impose earlier this year.

Maureen Corcoran is sworn in as Ohio Medicaid director by Gov. Mike DeWine in January.
Ohio Medicaid / Twitter

Ohio residents who will face work requirements to continue receiving Medicaid health care coverage won't lose their benefits until after they have spoken to a caseworker, according to a proposed state plan.

doctor
Pixabay

The House budget made no big moves on Medicaid or Medicaid expansion – which is a departure from the last budget, as lawmakers created restrictions and former Gov. John Kasich vetoed many of them.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on a citizenship question proposed for the 2020 census.

The court's ruling could affect Ohio in several ways. 

The state is expected to lose a congressional seat and an electoral vote after the 2020 Census, due to population declines. Those seats are apportioned on the basis of all residents in a state, not just citizens.

In 1985, Darrick Wade was living in Lakeview Terrace on Cleveland’s near west side with his family when he first started noticing something was off with his son, Demetrius.

"When he was about two years old, I believe he had an episode of an attack of the lead, that toxin," Wade said. "Because he shook a chair real angrily, and I didn’t understand where that anger came from at such a young age."

A jug of used needles to exchange in Camden, N.J., on Oct. 29, 2015.
Mel Evans / Associated Press

A new report by The Center for Community Solutions shows that programs that get used syringes off the streets in Ohio have more than doubled in the last three years.

Erik Drost / Flickr

Ohio officials have added 11 more counties for exemptions from work requirements under the food assistance program known as SNAP.

Charles Barilleaux / Flickr

While Ohio will allow some counties out of work requirements for food assistance, the state's policy means that most African-Americans recipients will not be exempt.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Ohio’s governor race has put a spotlight on Medicaid expansion, which provides health insurance for some 700,000 Ohioans. Now the debate as turned to who’s actually in that population.

Valeri Potapova / Shutterstock

With the blessing of the Trump administration, Ohio is looking into imposing work requirements on able-bodied Medicaid recipients. Last week, a healthcare advocacy group delivered hundreds of letters to the state Medicaid office to express their opposition to the plan.

Center for Community Solutions researcher John Begala
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

A study released in 2016 showed rural areas are disproportionately poor, uneducated and pay relatively high costs for crime and disability because of the loss of good jobs, local businesses and opioid abuse. But there’s an idea being floated to establish a special state fund for those rural counties.

House Minority Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton).
DAN KONIK

The proposal from Congressional Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act would dramatically cut funding to Medicaid, and Medicaid expansion in particular. That’s the looming issue as lawmakers try to move forward with the state budget.

Nurse call button on a hospital bed
Pixabay

The proposed repeal of the Affordable Care Act could cost Ohio as much as $8.5 billion over the next eight years, according to a report out this morning from a statewide research group.

Pixabay

A statewide think tank that studies health, education and economic issues is presenting data on Ohioans in a new way: taking district-specific data directly to state lawmakers.