Cecil Thomas | WOSU Radio

Cecil Thomas

Ohio lawmakers passed a law in 2006 that prevented local governments from passing any gun laws that are more restrictive than those enacted at the state level, and when cities challenged it, the Ohio Supreme Court upheld the law. Now, there’s a move afoot to change it.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

An Ohio Senate committee is holding hearings on several pieces of gun legislation on Tuesday. Some of the bills being heard in the Government Oversight and Reform Committee won the support of Republicans following last month’s Dayton mass shooting.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

Gov. Mike DeWine is calling for a version of the "Red Flag Law," expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

Last weekend brought huge protests over gun laws. It also featured another appearance by Gov. John Kasich on a Sunday morning national TV news show talking about his recent and public change of heart on gun laws.

But it’s still unclear whether recently discussed gun law changes will move forward with state lawmakers.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Among Gov. John Kasich’s new proposals on gun laws are a ban on accelerators called "bump stocks” and a so-called “red flag” bill, which would allow law enforcement to seize guns of people deemed to be dangerous.

State Sen. Nicki Antonio (D-Lakewood)
Ohio House

Two Republican state lawmakers have issued apologies for disparaging remarks they made earlier this week at a roast for a departing employee earlier this week. But some lawmakers are demanding more than apologies – they want a change in the culture they say is prevalent in the general assembly.

Ohio Statehouse Legislative Chamber
Bob Hall / Flickr

More allegations are surfacing about inappropriate sexual comments by Ohio lawmakers – this time at a party about a block away from the Statehouse.