cars

As the federal government takes a back seat in promoting electric vehicles some states, such as New Jersey, are taking the wheel.

There are nearly 1.5 million electric vehicles on U.S. roads today, according to the Edison Electric Institute. EV boosters concerned about climate change want even more and they say governments should help speed the transition away from internal combustion cars.

gas pump
David Zalubowski / Associated Press

Ohioans are paying more to fill up their vehicles compared to the same time of 2019.

A bipartisan bill in the Senate would offer incentives for electric vehicles by creating a $500 sales tax credit for purchase of an EV for personal use and higher tax credits for commercial use.

Cecily King, right, and her daughter Odessa hang a sign that says "If You're Going Through Hell Keep Going" over a Columbus highway.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

You are enough. You are valuable. You are worthy.

Mantras like these have been appearing on highway overpasses and bridges across Columbus over the last few months.

Just two days after the Trump administration revoked California's right to set its own emissions standards for automobiles, the state has fired back.

California, 22 other states and several major cities filed a lawsuit in federal court Friday against the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is the division of the Department of Transportation that issued the rule revoking California's authority.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday his administration is revoking a waiver that allowed California to set its own standards for automobile emissions — a move that could derail a years-long push to produce more fuel efficient cars.

In a series of tweets Wednesday, Trump said the action will result in vehicles that are safer and cheaper, and that "there will be very little difference in emissions between the California standard and the new U.S. standard."

The I-70/I-71 interchange will be getting a major redo in the coming years.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Traffic deaths in the Central Ohio region have increased since 2013, according to a new report from the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission.

The global carpooling market is expected to more than double by 2025. In Cincinnati and across the nation, it remains fairly low. The environmental group Cincinnati 2030 District is encouraging more people to do it and recently held a meeting about corporate carpooling.

The I-70/I-71 interchange will be getting a major redo in the coming years.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

It's about to get more expensive to register your vehicle in Columbus.

Multi-State Trooper Project Focuses On Distracted Driving

Apr 30, 2019
smarthphone in car
StockSnap / Pixabay

The State Highway Patrol says a recent distracted driving enforcement project with other members of the 6-State Trooper Project resulted in more than 1,600 citations for distracted driving-related offenses.

You could ride in a flying car as early as 2023 as long as you have the nerve and the money. Uber appears to be leading the pack of about a dozen developers. Research is also happening in Greater Cincinnati. UC students are designing their own model and hope to win $1 million in a competition.

The federal government is expanding an investigation into malfunctioning air bags to include an additional 12.3 million vehicles with air bags that could fail to inflate in a crash.

The next time parking enforcement officers use chalk to mark your tires, they might be acting unconstitutionally.

A federal appeals court ruled Monday that "chalking" is a violation of the Fourth Amendment.

The case was brought by Alison Taylor, a Michigan woman whom the court describes as a "frequent recipient of parking tickets." The city of Saginaw, Mich., like countless other cities around the country, uses chalk to mark the tires of cars to enforce time limits on parking.

Workers build Honda Accords at the Honda factory in Marysville, Ohio
Steve Brown / WOSU

Honda is slowing down production of the Accord and Civic cars at its factory in Marysville as car buyers eye trucks and SUVs.

Ohio State

The Ohio State University collected the most money last year of any entity in the state for specialty license plates, according to a newspaper's review of state data.

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