Cardinal Health

OxyContin pills are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont.
Toby Talbot / AP

The nation's three dominant drug distributors and a big drugmaker have reached a $260 million deal to settle a lawsuit related to the opioid crisis just as the first federal trial over the crisis was due to begin Monday.

The settlement means the closely watched trial will not move forward now, but it does not resolve more than 2,600 other lawsuits across the country seeking to hold the drug industry accountable for an opioid crisis that has been linked to more than 400,000 deaths in the U.S. since 2000.

Dave Yost speaks at the Ohio Republican Party event, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Yost was elected as the next Ohio attorney general.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio’s attorney general says his office is disappointed in a reported settlement with five drugmakers and distributors in advance of a huge opioid trial, a trial he tried to delay.

A group of drug companies is pushing for U.S. District Judge Dan Polster to recuse himself from the wide-reaching array of local government lawsuits over the opioid crisis, objecting to the judge’s push for settlements. 

Attorneys for Cardinal Health, McKesson, AmerisourceBergen and other drug makers and distributors filed the motion Saturday morning in federal court in Cleveland. 

Cardinal Health Counsel Says Company Has No Obligation To Public

Jul 24, 2019
Kiichiro Sato / Associated Press

An executive at Dublin-based Cardinal Health, one of the nation's largest drug distribution companies, said under questioning recently that the business has no obligation to the public when it comes to the amount of prescription opioid painkillers it ships.

The local governments suing drug companies over the opioid crisis have not reached a settlement in the more than 1,800 lawsuits pending in federal court in Cleveland.

But attorneys for the plaintiffs are proposing a way to divide up any settlement dollars among — possibly — all cities and counties across the country. The attorneys are asking Judge Dan Polster to approve the plan at a June 25 hearing. All Things Considered host Tony Ganzer spoke with ideastream’s Nick Castele about the cases, the proposal and if a settlement is likely.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
Jay LaPrete / AP

Several drug manufacturers targeted in lawsuits over the opioid epidemic have asked a federal judge in Cleveland to sanction Ohio's attorney general and governor-elect, along with two other lawyers, for statements they made in recent television interviews.

Alex Brandon / Associated Press

In a scene bringing back images of Big Tobacco CEOs taking the oath, the chair of Dublin-based drug distributor Cardinal Health appeared before a U.S. House subcommittee on Tuesday to apologize for how the company sent millions of pain pills into parts of West Virginia.

The largest business group in the state has put together a free online toolkit for any employer who’s dealing with opioid problems in the workplace – showing just how serious the epidemic is to businesses in Ohio.

Kiichiro Sato / Associated Press

The state of Ohio is joining cities, counties and some other states in suing four companies that distributed prescription painkillers that officials say helped fuel the deadly opioid crisis. And one of the targets is right here in Central Ohio.

Kiichiro Sato / Associated Press

Kentucky’s attorney general has added a lawsuit by his state to the more than 300 already filed against one of Central Ohio’s biggest companies, accusing it of playing a big role in creating the opioid crisis.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine handles a box of Narcan during a news conference on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Dozens of lawsuits filed by cities, counties and states across the country against opioid manufacturers and distributors will be consolidated in an Ohio court after a ruling issued by a group of federal judges Tuesday.

Before dawn, about 75 Teamsters and their supporters held candles to honor those who've died or are still struggling with addiction.
Mike Thompson / WOSU

The International Brotherhood of Teamsters continued its pressure on Dublin-based drug distributor Cardinal Health Wednesday morning with a vigil to call attention to Cardinal’s role in the opioid crisis.

Kiichiro Sato / Associated Press

Amid increasing pressure over the opiate epidemic, Dublin-based drug distributor Cardinal Health is making a leadership change. In a quarterly earnings call, CEO and chairman George Barrett announced he'll turn the CEO job over to the company's chief financial officer Mike Kaufmann. 

State of Ohio / Governor's office

A report from 60 Minutes and the Washington Post on Sunday suggested Central Ohio-based Cardinal Health and other opioid painkiller distributors persuaded Congress to weaken the Drug Enforcement Agency’s authority.

The city of Cincinnati wants three major drug distributors to pay for the opioid epidemic.

The city is the latest to file suit against AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health, and McKesson Corporation. A federal lawsuit alleges the companies let an epidemic run unchecked. A release from the city says those three companies account for 80 percent of the market for prescription opioids.

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