Canton | WOSU Radio

Canton

The city of Canton is expanding a program to attract new residents.

Since the mid-1990s the city has had four Community Reinvestment Areas. Now the whole city is part of the program. It allows property owners in the city to apply for a 15-year, 100% tax abatement.

To qualify, property owners must invest either $5,000 in existing property or build a new home.  

Christopher Hardesty, who runs the program, is hopeful it will revitalize the city.

Empty Bin Zero Waste

Ohio’s first zero-waste store is now open for business. The Canton store sells reusable items to replace single-use disposables like straws, facial wipes and sandwich bags.

School administrators are looking through the latest estimates from a new school funding formula proposal. While many lawmakers and some larger education groups, such as the Ohio Association of School Business Officials, have come out in support of the plan, there are individual school districts that are still not on board. 

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

President Donald Trump is returning to Ohio on Wednesday, the state that foretold his 2016 victory and serves as the linchpin of his re-election effort.

Downtown Akron Partnership

This year is shaping up to be a busy year for Northeast Ohio cities and towns trying to revitalize themselves. At least two dozen municipalities have turnaround plans in place, including Akron and Canton, which are spending more than $100 million between them to reinvent their downtowns.

The National Park Service is expanding its presence at the First Ladies National Historic Site in Canton. The site had been closed during the government shutdown but will reopen on Friday.

Whether it’s an All-Star Game, a Final Four tournament or a pro-sports draft, hosting big events costs local organizers money. A bill signed by Gov. John Kasich this month will give cities, counties and local host committees more help hosting such events.

Powell, Ohio
City of Powell

The state auditor finds signs of fiscal stress continue for several cities, including one of the state's wealthiest. The analysis indicates that the affluent suburb of Powell in Delaware County and others could now be on the verge of a fiscal emergency.

Every year, Gallup and Sharecare rank U.S. cities for well-being, based on how residents feel about living in their communities, and their health, finances, social ties and sense of purpose. Perhaps unsurprisingly, places like Naples, Fla., and Boulder, Col., tend to top the list, while Southern and Midwestern towns including Canton, Ohio, and Fort Smith, Ark., often come in last. But what hard data underpin the differences between these communities?

Pro Football Hall Of Fame

The Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton says its billion-dollar expansion project is back on track after questions about funding.

Earlier this year, contractors had filed about $8 million in liens after working on the Hall of Fame’s stadium project. Those liens have been settled, with interest, according to Hall of Fame spokesman Pete Fierle. He also says it’s a “misnomer” that a sales tax increase might be used to help fund the project. 

Tim Rudell / WKSU

Union Metal in Canton gave 300-plus workers the word last month that the plant is closing for good this month, and they’re all out of work. Ohio is offering a special set of information sessions to help the employees find something new.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton is now a nationally accredited museum.  It’s the first major sports hall of fame to hold that designation. 

Like the Smithsonian or the Ohio History Center in Columbus the Pro Football Hall of Fame is now on the register of the American Alliance of Museums

Two of Ohio’s newly licensed medical marijuana cultivators plan to open facilities in Akron, and several more could be coming to Northeast Ohio as well.

At most museums, what you see on display is often just a fraction of an entire collection. An exhibit at The Canton Museum of Art through the end of October is taking a challenge and turning it into an opportunity to show much, much more.

One of the longest-serving Ohioans in Congress is being remembered as a proud Republican, yet nonpartisan public servant. Ralph Regula, who represented Northeast Ohio for 36 years, died Wednesday in his home. He was 92.

'A good man'

People remembering Ralph Regula quickly get to two points.

“He was an exceptional person;” and “he got things done.” 

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